ALL-NEW STINGER

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GENERAL TECHNICAL INFORMATION KIA STINGER GT S TECHNICAL INFORMATION

The new Kia Stinger - Jan 2018

THE NEW KIA STINGER
Short story

  • Kia's first grand tourer and first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Fastback-style 5-door gran turismo based on Kia GT Concept
  • Evokes memories of the golden age of beautiful grand tourers
  • Three turbocharged engines, all with an eight-speed automatic gearbox
  • Range-topping model powered by a 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 engine capable of 0-60mph in 4.7 seconds – faster than any previous Kia
  • All-independent suspension, adjustable in range-topping model
  • Three distinct trim lines in a five-model range
  • Equipped with state-of-the-art driver aids and connectivity systems

Kia is bringing back the golden age of beautiful and elegant high-performance gran turismo cars with the stunning Stinger, the most adventurous model in the company's history.

Stinger is the first classic grand tourer from Kia and the first rear-wheel-drive model the company has introduced to Europe. In range-topping twin-turbo V6 guise it is also the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds.    

Six years in the making, it has evolved from the Kia GT Concept revealed at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. In the intervening years many people questioned whether Kia would be bold enough to step outside its comfort zone and sanction a production model, but the company was simply waiting until the time was right to do so. That time is now. 

Stinger was designed in Europe at the Frankfurt studios under the watch of President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume. Prototypes have covered the equivalent of 27 trips around the Equator, taking in extreme climate testing in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North and South America, to perfect the car, and many development cars have done at least 480 laps (10,000 kilometres) of the tortuous Nürburgring Nordschleife. The testing regime was headed by Kia's Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, Albert Biermann.

Five versions of the car are available in the UK, all with turbocharged direct-injection engines mated to an eight-speed automatic gearbox and featuring state-of-the-art electronic driver aids and connectivity systems. The ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ offer the choice of a 2.0-litre 244bhp T-GDi petrol engine or a 2.2-litre 197bhp CRDi turbodiesel, while the range-topping  ‘GT S’ is sold exclusively with a 3.3-litre 365bhp twin-turbo V6. The  ‘GT S’, as the fastest and most powerful model in the range, also has electronic suspension damping and Brembo brakes.      

A gran turismo, not a sports car
Stinger is not a hard-edged sports car created to be brutally fast at the expense of comfort. Rather, it is about the joy of the journey, where getting to the final destination can be an anti-climax.

"The Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive," says Gregory Guillaume. "This car is all about the journey. It's about passion. To embody that passion we believe that proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, the width and the height – even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical." Stinger is 4,830mm long, 1,870mm wide and just 1,400mm tall, and has a 2,905mm wheelbase.

It was inspired by the elegant grand tourers Guillaume saw as a child growing up in 1970s France, wafting their occupants effortlessly from Paris to St Tropez and other glamour spots on the Riviera. Even as a young boy Guillaume was drawing his own ideas for elegant grand tourers, hoping that one day they might become reality. They were his inspiration for the 2011 GT Concept and, subsequently, Stinger.     

Stinger exhibits classic gran turismo proportions – long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase, cabin positioned towards the rear of the car, lengthy rear overhang beneath broad shoulders and a 'Coke-bottle' nip in the waist. It sets a template for Kia's bold and exciting future and is the final step in the company's transition from a manufacturer of purely rational, durable, value-centric cars to one able to compete with the world's best for desirability, design and technology.    

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights and bold rear diffuser with quad tailpipes on petrol models and twin tailpipes on diesels. There are 18-inch alloy wheels on ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions and 19-inch wheels on ’GT S’.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. There are air curtains at the front and finned gills behind the rear wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting its stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

An interior fit for cross-continent travel
Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’.   

There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated.     

The luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor.  

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control.   

In GT-Line there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while GT-Line S and GT S have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.    

Powertrains perfectly tuned for long-distance touring
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be powerful . The three turbocharged engines chosen for Stinger are ideally suited to its role as a long-distance gran turismo.

On the one hand the 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph, while on the other the 2.2-litre CRDi's combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg gives it a touring range of comfortably more than 600 miles. In between there is the 2.0-litre T-GDi offering much of the best of both: acceleration from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds with combined fuel economy of 35.8mpg, allowing it to cover more than 450 miles before the driver will need to stop for fuel.   

The 2.0-litre T-GDI (Turbocharged Gasoline Direct injection) engine is from the Theta II family. It develops 244bhp at 6,200rpm and 353Nm of torque all the way from 1,400 to 3,500rpm, ensuring outstanding driveability. The 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 is a member of the Lambda II range and can deliver 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm. The 2.2-litre CRDi is from the R family, developed and made in Korea, and delivers 197bhp at 3,800rpm and 440Nm of torque, also across a wide range – 1,750 to 2,750rpm.

All versions drive the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. Stinger’s transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A limited slip differential is fitted to all models so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines, the car is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound System. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Sportiness with comfort: the ideal gran turismo combination
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, culminating in the mileage accumulated by prototypes around the Nürburgring, Stinger meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.       

All versions have fully independent suspension through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, but there are two different systems. ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ have a passive set-up, while ’GT S’ introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting which introduces more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is available in ‘GT S’, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.             

Stinger's brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are ventilated discs of varying size at all four corners for the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 models, with ventilated front discs and solid rear discs for the 2.2-litre CRDi models.  

The brakes for the 3.3-litre ’GT S’ were co-developed with Brembo and are 350mm front and 340mm rear discs, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.    

There are 18-inch alloy wheels with 225/45 R18 tyres for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’, while the ’GT S’ has 19-inch alloys with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Fully equipped of a modern gran turismo
Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.  

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a wireless phone charger.       

Warranty and Servicing
The extensive testing regime undertaken with Stinger means that it enjoys the same seven-year/100,000-mile warranty as any of the company's other models. This declaration of faith in the car's reliability and quality covers all labour and parts except those subject to normal wear and tear, and is transferable if the car is sold before the time/mileage limit expires.

UK line-up:

Model

Power bhp

Torque

Nm

0-60 sec

Max speed mph

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi GT-Line

244

353

5.8

149

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi GT-Line

197

440

7.3

143

48.7

154

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi GT-Line S

244

353

5.8

149

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi GT-Line S

197

440

7.3

143

48.7

154

Stinger 3.3 T-GDi V6

365

510

4.7

168

28.5

225

 

AT A GLANCE  
An instant guide to our stunning new gran turismo

General

  • Five-door, five-seater fastback-style grand tourer
  • Takes Kia into a new market sector
  • Kia's first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Captures style and character of cars from golden age of grand tourers
  • Evolved from the Kia GT Concept unveiled at 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show
  • Designed in Europe with input from main design centre at Namyang in Korea
  • Five models based on three powertrains and three trim grades
  • Many prototypes have completed 1.1 million kilometres of testing – 27 times around world
  • Many development cars have done 10,000 kilometres – 480 laps – around Nürburgring
  • Built at Sohari in South Korea

Design

  • Stinger is a halo performance car and a template for Kia's bold and exciting future
  • Classic gran turismo proportions with a long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase and long rear overhang with broad shoulders
  • 'Coke-bottle' nip in waist
  • Typical Kia identifiers include 'tiger-nose' grille between complex headlights, castellated windscreen and simple, unadorned flanks
  • Special aerodynamic features include front air curtains, wheel-arch gills, a smooth underbody tray and an integrated rear diffuser
  • 18-inch alloy wheels for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ and 19-inch alloys on ’GT S’
  • Twin exhaust pipes on diesels and quad exhausts on petrol models
  • Cocooning intimacy with space for five and their luggage
  • 406-litre boot with rear seats in use and 1,114 litres with them folded
  • Winged dashboard with high horizontal sweep interrupted only by central touchscreen
  • Leather (‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’) or Nappa leather (’GT S’) upholstery
  • Leather also trims D-shaped steering wheel, gearshifter, dashboard and door armrests
  • Five aeronautically inspired air vents
  • Aluminium finish centre console, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, suede headlining and stainless steel door scuff plates emphasise gran turismo luxury and quality

Technical

  • Three turbocharged engines
  • 244bhp 2.0-litre turbo and 197bhp 2.2-litre turbodiesel for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’
  • 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 for ’GT S’
  • ’GT S’ is fastest-accelerating Kia ever (0-60mph in 4.7 seconds)
  • Eight-speed automatic transmission fitted to all versions
  • Rear-wheel drive
  • MacPherson strut front suspension with multi-link rear suspension
  • Electronically controlled Dynamic Stability Damping Control on ’GT S’
  • Suspension of right-hand-drive cars benefits from additional testing on UK roads
  • Rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) with two modes standard, with variable gear ratio in ’GT S’
  • Ventilated disc brakes front and rear, developed with Brembo, for ’GT S’
  • Limited Slip Differential standard
  • 225/45 R18 tyres for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line’ S; 225/40 R19 (front) and 255/35 R19 (rear) for ’GT S’
  • Body constructed from 55 per cent high-strength steels for strength with lightness

Technology

  • All models feature Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, High Beam Assist, Speed Limit Information warning, Driver Attention Warning and an Active Bonnet to protect pedestrians in a collision
  • ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ add Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert
  • Vehicle Stability Management system incorporates dynamic torque vectoring
  • 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system, Kia Connected Services with TomTom and Android Auto and Apple CarPlay with voice control standard
  • All models also feature Bluetooth with music streaming, a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility, a customisable head-up display and a 7.0-inch full-colour Thin Film Transistor supervision cluster
  • Nine-speaker audio system with under-seat subwoofer in ‘GT-Line’; 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’
  • ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree Around View Monitor and a wireless mobile phone charger 

 

THE DESIGN STORY    
How the Kia GT Concept became the Stinger

In 2011 Kia unveiled its GT Concept on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show. It was created at the company's European design studios next door to the show site, and a pointer to the fact that Kia did not intend to remain rooted in its then range of workaday hatchbacks, saloons, estates and SUVs forever. Since that day, the most frequently asked question at Kia events has been "when are you going to put the GT into production".    

Gregory Guillaume, the Head of the European design studio, says: “All of our concept cars have a reason, a purpose. They are not designers' indulgences. They illustrate what we are thinking. Ultimately, what matters is what comes on to the street, not what stays in the design studio – and we knew the GT Concept would, one day, go in to production.”

So, when a rear-wheel-drive gran turismo based on the GT Concept was signed off for production, where better to turn than Guillaume and the Frankfurt studio, with the whole project being overseen by Peter Schreyer, Kia President of Design and Chief Design Officer.

Turning a concept into a production car is no small feat, however. "On a concept car everything is exaggerated. It's an abstract," says Guillaume. "Actually, we think the production car came out nicer than the project car – there were some areas we were never really satisfied with, like the C-pillar. So we started to change that area and it affected the whole car."

Exterior
The idea behind the concept car was simple. It would echo the spirit of iconic 1970s gran turismo cars, the elegant and powerful vehicles capable of powering passengers from Paris to the Côte d'Azur for the weekend in impeccable style and at high speed. "As a child growing up in France in the 1970s, I was unconstrained by the limits of engineering and I drew cars that were to my eyes, beautiful, dynamic, original and, of course, very fast. I believed those dreams could be a reality.

"Those dreams were the inspiration for the GT concept in 2011. It embodied that grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive or gauche. But it was more than just a design exercise. Once Stinger was given the green light for production, the idea was to channel the spirit of those iconic gran turismos to create something emotional and elegant."

The GT Concept embodied grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive. “We were convinced from day one that we would take this concept car from motor show plinth to the road, knowing that we have the freedom within Kia to stretch the brand in many directions," says Guillaume. “Stinger is not about outright power, hard-edged dynamics and brutal styling at the expense of luxury, comfort and grace. Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive at the destination – this car is all about the journey. It’s about passion."

Guillaume believes that to embody that passion, proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, width and height – and even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical.

Key to its road presence are its rear-wheel-drive proportions – a long bonnet and short
830mm front overhang, an extended wheelbase (2,905mm) to deliver a spacious cabin, and a long rear overhang (1,095mm) with strong, broad shoulders. Stinger’s stance, proportion and visual balance are designed to lend the car an air of elegance and athleticism, rather than aggression and brutality. Stinger measures 4,830mm in length and 1,870mm in width, and is 1,400 tall. The ‘Coke-bottle’ shape of the car’s flanks highlight the shoulder line, as well as the fastback silhouette.

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights and bold rear diffuser. There are 18-inch alloy wheels on ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions and 19-inch wheels on ’GT S’.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. There are air curtains at the front and finned gills behind the rear wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting its stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

Schreyer says: “You cannot believe how excited I am about this car. Stinger is going to fundamentally change the global image of Kia. It will revolutionise the way people think about us. It’s going to propel us upwards into a different era.”

Interior
External gran turismo visual cues are complemented by the layout and atmosphere of the low-slung cabin, with a steeply-raked windscreen and high dashboard running along a horizontal plane. The dashboard’s centre console is split into two specific areas: the infotainment controls sit neatly below a large colour touchscreen, while the climate and ventilation controls are lower down. In front of the driver is a thick, leather-wrapped steering wheel and a single instrument binnacle with a combination of analogue and digital instrumentation. The large gauges are ringed in metal and accentuated with sweeping red needles.

Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’. There is 974mm of headroom in the front and only slightly less – 939mm – in the rear. The respective figures for legroom are 1,083mm and 925mm, and for shoulder room they are 1,433mm and 1,391mm. The boot capacity with the 60:40 split rear seats upright is 406 litres, which extends to 1,114 litres when they are lowered.      

The wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are heated. The chunky transmission tunnel that separates the driver and passenger compartments reinforces the car’s rear-drive layout.

The luxurious ambience is emphasised by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor. 

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with and music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control. In ‘GT-Line’ there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while ‘GT-Line S’and ’GT S’ have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.  

“Working on this car was a dream. I still get a buzz, a thrill when I think about it, and I have been thinking about it for a very long time. It fills me with pride, and now I just cannot wait to see it on the road,” says Guillaume.

 

THE TESTING STORY      
Stinger has been 27 times around the world to hone it to perfection

The Nürburgring Nordschleife (North Loop) became known as 'The Green Hell' for very good reason. It runs for more than 13 miles through the Eifel mountains in Germany, and contains 73 corners, a 300-metre difference in height between its highest and lowest points, and has gradients of up to 17 per cent.

Driving round it demands constant hard acceleration and braking and heavy cornering. There are changing surfaces and cambers offering an unrivalled test of a car's dynamic prowess. As a test facility it is merciless, which is why Kia has established a base there. Every new model – including Stinger – is tested there to hone its suspension, steering and brakes. The testing regime was so punishing that brake pads had to be changed half way through each day.

During the development of Stinger, prototypes were put through at least 10,000 km, or 480 laps, of high-stress driving around the Nordschleife – not to set a lap time which would be irrelevant to customers, but to ensure the finished product would be a genuine gran turismo. One diesel prototype completed 20,000 km around the Nordschleife. The engine had already covered the full 10,000-kilometre testing distance, but further work to the chassis meant engineers needed to test a series of new components. With new parts fitted, the same powertrain completed a second 10,000-kilometre run.

The automatic transmission was a key focus for powertrain testing. Nordschleife testing identified a need to manage heat in the transmission more efficiently: initially, the temperature of the gearbox oil was rising higher than what was deemed acceptable by the engineers. To counteract this, an oil cooler with a larger surface area was adopted.

Suspension and steering
Stinger’s dynamics presented the engineers with a new challenge. Because this was going to be a totally new kind of car for Kia, the chassis engineers were given a blank canvas for the suspension and steering characteristics. Their brief was to create a true gran turismo which would drive the way it looks. The shape of the car inspired efforts to imbue Stinger with agile handling and high levels of body control for enthusiastic driver, but with a compliant ride that would ensure high-speed cruising comfort over long distances.

Two different types of suspension resulted. Every Stinger has MacPherson struts at the front and fully-independent multi-link suspension at the rear. However, the ‘clean sheet’ approach allowed the engineers to create both a traditional passive setup and a new adaptive system – Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC). DSDC adapts the stroke length of the dampers on the move, and is controlled by acceleration, braking and steering sensors.

Drivers can change the characteristics of the shock absorbers via the Drive Mode Selector, which offers five modes - Eco, Normal, Sport, Sport + and Smart settings. In Normal mode, low levels of damping force ensure maximum cruising comfort. The suspension continues to firm up slightly under heavy cornering, but the effect is less pronounced than in Sport mode. DSDC is fitted as standard to the 3.3-litre V6 Stinger.

The passive suspension was designed to the same brief as the DSDC system. It was verified alongside DSDC at the Nürburgring Nordschleife and on the road. It is based on Kia’s most refined multi-link suspension, but has been redesigned with stiffer springs and stabiliser bars for more immediate handling responses.

Stinger’s rack-mounted motor-driven power steering system (R-MDPS) provided the chassis engineers with greater flexibility for tuning. Fitted to the Stinger GT S, R-MDPS lets drivers choose between two steering modes via the Drive Mode Selector: Normal and Sport. These modes change the level of steering effort required, and also the variable steering ratio.

In Sport mode, Stinger requires increased on-centre steering effort, and has shorter gearing, reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Normal mode reduces the steering effort from the on-centre position for more measured steering responses at a cruise. Normal mode also requires more effort as the steering wheel turns, with a linear build-up of resistance to give drivers greater confidence. The result is a steering system providing the same duality as the suspension – one that’s as relaxing and confidence-inspiring to use in a straight line as it is immediate and engaging on more enjoyable roads.

Right-hand-drive versions of the Stinger were put through a further level of dynamic testing in the UK to hone the steering and suspension for the country's uniquely challenging roads.

Brakes
The 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 in the Stinger ’GT S’ enables the car to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in just 4.7 seconds, making it the fastest-accelerating production Kia ever. Its high-performance brakes therefore needed to be equal to the task.

To ensure this would be the case, a rigorous range of braking challenges was devised, taking in the famous Grossglockner High Alpine Road in the Austrian Alps for constant downhill brake testing. Private test facilities in Northern Germany and Eastern Spain, as well as the Nürburgring, were also used.

Stinger’s brakes not only had to offer strong and consistent braking power. A reassuring and responsive feel to the pedal was also demanded by the engineers, even after repeated heavy braking, for maximum driver confidence. More development work has been carried out on the Stinger’s brakes than on any previous Kia.

The ’GT S’ features a new braking system developed with Brembo. The 350mm front and 340mm Brembo discs are holed and grooved, providing high heat capacity and reduced fade levels under repeated heavy use. They are paired with the most powerful calipers ever found on a Kia.

Early in Stinger’s development, engineers considered carbon ceramic brakes to maximise the braking power. However, as a Kia, Stinger needed to remain affordable to buy and maintain. Brembo’s brakes proved more than up to what was required of them.

Kia’s internal tests are designed to validate brakes at temperatures of up to 700°C (1,292°F). Engineers went even further for the Brembo brake system, with temperatures rising to more than 800°C (1,472°F). Even at these temperatures, Stinger’s brakes continue to offer onsistent braking power and pedal feel.

All roads and all weathers 
Kia did not confine Stinger testing to the Nürburgring. Prototypes have been driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator – to test Stinger's durability. Extreme climate testing took place across Europe, the Middle East, Asia and North and South America. Stinger was subjected to extreme cold and heat and high altitude, and faced the unique demands of the desert, permafrost regions, congested city centres and mountain passes.

Stinger was plunged into Arctic winters to ensure predictable, stable, gran turismo handling in all conditions with the engaging, fun-to-drive character of a rear-wheel drive car. From the development facility in Arjeplog in Swedish Lapland, Kia honed Stinger in a range of low-grip environments, including a skid-pan, handling circuit and slalom test on the surface of the frozen Uddjaure lake. Kia’s winter test regime saw the car being driven in temperatures as low as -35°C (-31°F).

Stinger‘s on-road refinement was equally important, but customers also want to enjoy the sound of the engine at work. Stinger is the first Kia with an Active Sound system to enhance the engine note via the car’s audio rather than through an actuator which channels noise into the cabin. 

The Active Sound system was engineered in Europe and is consistent with the type of engine. The 3.3-litre engine authentically enhances the distinctive V6 engine note, while the 2.0-litre T-GDi lets drivers enjoy the sportier character of the four-cylinder unit under acceleration.

The system also refines the sound of the 2.2-litre diesel engine, masking certain elements and enhancing others for a more refined note.

Sound engineers have paired the system with Stinger’s Drive Mode Selector, enabling drivers to change the level of engine noise in the cabin. The sound becomes slightly louder and more aggressive in tone as drivers switch modes.   

Albert Biermann, Kia’s Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, says: “Testing the car in extreme conditions allowed us to focus on its stability and predictability in every configuration and in all driving conditions. Crucially, these tests allowed us to engineer a car which retains the driving appeal that buyers look for in a gran turismo. We want enthusiastic drivers to be able to enjoy the thrill of driving their Stinger in all conditions without compromising on safety.”

 

THE TECHNICAL STORY   
Powertrains, suspension, steering and brakes befitting a grand tourer

Everything about Stinger has been engineered to ensure it is an authentic modern gran turismo. From its torquey turbocharged engines to its eight-speed automatic transmission, fully independent suspension – with switchable modes in the ’GT S’ – powerful brakes and variable steering, it is a car built for covering long distances swiftly, comfortably and safely while delivering maximum driving pleasure.

The body is composed of 55 per cent high-strength steels to keep weight to a minimum so that Stinger is as lithe and agile as it looks while ensuring robustness in the event of an accident, and there is a battery of advanced driver assistance systems to make that accident less likely. And extensive work on sound-deadening ensures it is as refined as it is comfortable, but occupants can still enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines thanks to an Active Sound system –­ the first in a Kia.

Three turbocharged engines
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be fast. The three turbocharged engines chosen for Stinger are ideally suited to its role as a long-distance gran turismo.

On the one hand the 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph, while on the other the 2.2-litre CRDi's combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg gives it a touring range of comfortably more than 600 miles. In between there is the 2.0-litre T-GDi offering much of the best of both: acceleration from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds with combined fuel economy of 35.8mpg, allowing it to cover more than 450 miles before the driver will need to stop for fuel.   

The 2.0-litre, 1,998cc T-GDi (Turbocharged Gasoline Direct injection) engine is from the Theta II family. It is an all-aluminium unit with identical cylinder bore and piston stroke measurements of 86mm. In Stinger it develops 244bhp at 6,200rpm and 353Nm of torque all the way from 1,400 to 3,500rpm, ensuring outstanding driveability. The engine features a scroll turbocharger and continuously variable valve timing on both the inlet and exhaust sides.

Its low displacement conforms to Kia's policy of downsizing to maximise efficiency. Smaller engines cause less friction, while direct injection cools the charge down, allowing the engine to run leaner without causing detonation. The intake manifold is lightweight composite while the wastegate is electronically controlled for precise boost control at part throttle. The block is reinforced to deal with the load being placed upon it, and there are large coolant ports in the head for optimum heat dissipation.

The 2.0-litre T-GDi engine allows the Stinger to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in 5.8 seconds and on to a top speed of 149mph. Yet it is capable of 35.8mpg while cruising, while CO2 emissions are 181g/km.

The 3.3-litre, 3,342cc twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is a member of the Lambda II range and produces 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It features an aluminium block and heads and was developed during a rigorous testing regime focused on responsiveness and efficiency with durability and reliability. There are twin single-scroll turbochargers, an air-cooled intercooler and an integral turbo and exhaust manifold to reduce weight. An electronic wastegate and thermostat help to improve responsiveness. Continuously-variable valve timing (CVVT) enhances intake operation range and operation speed while reducing pumping loss. There are sodium-filled exhaust valves to boost performance and efficiency while offering structural reinforcement for improved durability.

The twin-turbo V6 makes Stinger the fastest-accelerating Kia ever. From standstill to 60mph takes just 4.7 seconds, and the top speed is 168mph where permitted. Yet the extensive testing regime to ensure durability and responsiveness has also helped efficiency: combined fuel consumption is 28.5mpg, while CO2 emissions are 225g/km.

The 2.2-litre CRDi is from the R family, developed and made in Korea, and delivers 197bhp at 3,800rpm and 440Nm of torque across a wide range – 1,750 to 2,750rpm. It is a 2,199cc 16-valve four-cylinder unit with chain-driven overhead camshafts and a variable geometry turbocharger and intercooler. The fourth-generation common-rail fuel injection system features piezo injectors, and the injection pressure is up to 2,000 bar. Other technical highlights include an actuator which gives precise turbocharger control for superior acceleration and fuel economy and a special coating to reduce friction on the piston skirt.

The intake manifold, cylinder head cover and oil filter housing are made of plastic to help trim weight. With an intake manifold featuring electronic swirl control and an exhaust gas filtration system that promotes the recirculation of clean, cool, low-pressure exhaust gas, the R-family diesel engine is clean and efficient.

With combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg, the Stinger 2.2-litre CRDi is capable of travelling comfortably more than 600 miles on a single 60-litre fill-up, while its CO2 emissions are just 154g/km. But it is anything other than a poor relation to the petrol models for performance. Its strong and easily accessed torque allows it to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in 7.3 seconds, and the top speed is 143mph.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines, the car is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound system. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Eight-speed automatic gearbox
All versions of Stinger drive the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. Stinger’s transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A Limited Slip Differential is fitted to all models so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

Running gear
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, Stinger meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.      

All versions have fully independent suspension through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, but there are two different systems. ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ have a passive set-up, while ’GT S’ introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting which introduces more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is standard on the ‘GT S’, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.            

Stinger's brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are ventilated discs of varying size at all four corners for the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 models, with ventilated front discs and solid rear discs for the 2.2-litre CRDi models. 

The brakes for the 3.3-litre GT S were co-developed with Brembo and are 350mm front and 340mm rear, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.   

There are 18-inch alloy wheels with 225/45 R18 tyres for GT-Line and GT-Line S, while the GT S has 19-inch alloys with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Safety
Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear.

Stinger's safety provisions begin with its sturdy body, 55 per cent of which is composed of high-strength steels so that rigidity and crash protection do not come at the expense of excessive weight. Structural adhesives are used extensively and the attachment points for the powertrain and chassis, where loads are most concentrated in the vehicle’s frame, are extremely rigid. By strengthening the longitudinal and transverse structures and using an engine room strut bar, the frame exceeds competitive car standards.

In terms of crashworthiness, the Stinger exceeds all competitors. The side member is formed from 80 K-class steel. The rear lower member is formed from 150 K-class steel, and as much available crash space as possible has been included. To protect passengers in a rear collision, the lightweight high-stiffness body in white (BIW) is so strong that it surpasses European car standards.

To achieve this, the lower part of the body, a critical area in a collision, is made of hot stamped, ultra-high-strength steel with a large steel plate. Carefully defined load paths channel impact forces away from the passenger cell, and there are seven airbags – including one for the driver's knees – to protect occupants.   

However, Stinger has been engineered to ensure that, as much as possible, such features will not be needed through a comprehensive network of advanced driver assistance systems. All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

GT-Line S and GT S supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to reduce damage  to pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

 

RANGE FINDER  
Five models based on three powertrains and three trim levels 

There are five versions of Stinger in the UK, based on three powertrains and three trim grades. There are ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions powered by the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 2.2-litre CRDi engines, while the twin-turbo 3.3-litre V6 T-GDi is exclusively available in top-of-the-range ’GT S’ guise. All drive the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic gearbox.

As halo models in the Kia line-up, all are luxuriously equipped, and feature an extensive range of advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity services as standard. Leather upholstery and trim, a power-adjustable memory driver's seat, heated seats and steering wheel, a smart key entry system with an engine start/stop button and an 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation and infotainment system are just a few of the highlights fitted to all five models. 

Advanced connectivity and driver assistance systems
All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information System.  

‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking g-force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom™, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a wireless phone charger.

A high standard specification for all versions
Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’.   

There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated.    

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor. 

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth and music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control. In ‘GT-Line’ there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.

There are 18-inch alloy wheels for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’, and 19-inch alloys with ’GT S’. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have an electric one-touch sunroof and LED headlamps, and all versions have LED daytime running lights and tail lamps. There are quad exhaust pipes on petrol versions and dual exhausts on diesels. ’GT S’ has brakes co-developed with Brembo.

To emphasise the quality designed and engineered into Stinger, the luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

 

THE TECHNOLOGY STORY   
The best in advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity

Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

Stinger's advanced driver aids are controlled by cameras and radar to supplement the driver's vision and reactions. They are not there to take over the operation of the car or to spoil the driver's enjoyment in driving it.

All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which employs both short- and long-range radar systems so that it can detect vehicles and pedestrians at greater distances and higher speeds. The short-range radar operates at typical city speeds of up to 31mph. Between 19mph and 50mph the longer-range radar also comes into play to detect obstacles in the car's path and respond by automatically slowing the car, to a complete stop if necessary. The pedestrian detection function operates at up to 37mph.

Lane Keep Assist is also standard, and prevents the driver from straying into an adjoining lane accidentally. If the driver begins to change lane without first indicating, Stinger will issue audible and visual alerts and, if no action is taken, steer itself back into lane. It is therefore more effective than a simple lane departure warning.

One reason why drivers might inadvertently change lanes is that they are becoming tired, Stinger mitigates against that through its Driver Attention Warning. Through a camera and sensors it first builds up a profile of the driving style of the person behind the wheel. If it then detects significant variations from that profile it then alerts the driver that it is time to take a break.

High Beam Assist, also standard, adjusts the headlight beam range between main and dipped according to other traffic and local lighting.

Stinger also has a Speed Limit Information System.  
‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces.

An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to reduce damage to pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom™, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

Kia Connected Services with TomTom™ are accessed through the 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system. The information available to drivers includes live traffic updates, weather reports, speed camera locations and local point-of-interest searches, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants and hotels.

The system is compatible with Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™, both of which are standard fitments. Android Auto is available when the system is paired with Android smartphones running 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher, while Apple CarPlay is compatible with iPhone 5 and newer versions of the Apple handset. Both allow occupants to connect to various apps and functions, including voice-guided, hands-free calls and texts and voice recognition. Android Auto gives access to Google maps navigation and Google Play music, while Apple CarPlay links to pre-loaded maps, music, podcasts, texts and messages and audiobooks, all through Siri voice control.

A reversing camera is standard and all models have Bluetooth with music streaming.    

 

 THE OWNERSHIP STORY 
The reliability, warranty and affordable running costs expected of a Kia

Stinger may be a completely new kind of Kia – but it is still a Kia. That means it has the reliability to sustain Kia's industry-leading seven-year or 100,000-mile warranty, which – as with every one of the company's models – is supplied as standard.

Every prototype was driven for at least 10,000 kilometres around the Nürburgring Nordschleife, not only to hone the car's dynamic abilities, but also to ensure Stinger would be just as durable as any other Kia. Prototypes were also driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator ­– on all kinds of roads and in the most extreme climates to test the car's durability. Right-hand-drive versions were further tested in the UK to ensure they could meet the unique challenges posed by the country's roads.   

All five versions of Stinger are extensively equipped and do not require buyers to spend a small fortune on options to bring the car up to an acceptable specification. And while a car such as Stinger can never be cheap to run, ownership costs are far from outlandish for a car such as this.

Fuel consumption (mpg) and CO2 (g/km)

Model

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

48.7

154

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

48.7

154

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

28.5

225

 

Benefit-in-kind taxation rates and VED (2017-18)

Model

Tax rate

VED first year/thereafter

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

35%

£800/£140

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

31%

£500/£140

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

35%

£800/£140

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

31%

£500/£140

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

37%

£1,200/£450*

 

* For five years: £140 per year thereafter

Insurance groups

Model

1-50

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

34

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

32

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

36

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

34

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

41

 

 Servicing

  • 6,000 miles or every six months (petrol)
  • 10,000 miles or every 12 months (diesel)

Warranty and support
Kia set a new benchmark in 2007 when it launched the cee'd with an industry-best seven-year warranty.  That demonstration of faith in the quality and reliability of Kia products has subsequently been extended to every model.

A major benefit is that it is transferable to subsequent owners at no charge as long as the seven-year time limit has not been reached and the mileage is below 100,000.  If the car is sold when less than 18 months old or with less than 18,000 miles on the clock, the warranty is topped up to match that of a new model.

The mechanical warranty is supported by a 12-year anti-perforation warranty and a five-year paint warranty plus one-year Europe-wide roadside assistance through KIAssist.

 

MANUFACTURING AND THE ENVIRONMENT   
Built in South Korea on a special rear-wheel-drive production line

Stinger is built at Kia's Sohari factory in South Korea, on a special production line dedicated to rear-wheel-drive cars. The same line also builds the Kia K9 (K900 in America and Quoris in some Middle East and South America markets), and is a relatively new addition to the Sohari plant, emphasising the versatility of Kia production facilities and the company's willingness to adapt to suit its changing market ambitions and global image.

Sohari is the place where it all started for Kia as we know it today: the plant opened in June 1973. It is located within greater Seoul, on a 500,000m2 site to the south-west of the city centre, and currently has a staff of just under 5,300. Sohari is capable of building 350,000 cars a year. Stinger production is not limited, so output can be modified to accommodate demand.

Sohari may be Kia’s oldest plant, but it has been extensively modernised to improve its efficiency and the lives of the people working there, reduce its impact on the environment and to ensure that the quality of cars leaving the factory gates is at an all-time high.

Although only about 2 per cent of a car’s lifetime CO2 emissions are created during manufacture, this can still amount to a substantial figure when multiplied by the total production capacity of a factory. So, even small improvements can add up to major reductions when rolled out across the entire production network. All Kia plants are working to reduce their impact on the environment by putting in place clean and efficient processes.

In recent years the focus at Sohari has been on developing ever more flexible production systems. As part of that, staff have been encouraged to find and adopt innovative production activities.  Everyone at Sohari has been helping to make the plant less wasteful and more environmentally friendly. As a result, the plant has been one of Kia’s leading lights in environmental change.

Improved painting facilities have been installed, and every aspect of vehicle production has been under scrutiny to ensure the plant uses less energy and produces less waste. Water and power consumption, dust and CO2 emissions per vehicle produced and contaminants and waste volumes have all been reduced.

Kia has made reducing the amount of raw materials being fed into the production process a major priority in every production facility around the globe. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in reducing waste, increasing recycling and developing cleaner production processes.

Exhaust pollutants from Sohari have also decreased dramatically – dust, NOx and SO2 output have all been reduced.

New technology is playing a significant part in environmental improvement. Typical cast melting furnaces produce large amounts of dust and contained within this is a high proportion of zinc. The captured dust is treated and the zinc extracted before being re-used within the production process.

More technology is employed in the machining shops where gearboxes are produced. Compressed air is used as a coolant when machining intricate gearbox internals, rather than cutting oil. This and the associated oil mist are problem pollutants and the new scheme is helping reduce oil use.

The green landscape around each facility is an important part of each plant make-up. One ongoing programme is based on a number of ‘ecology gardens’ which are filled with trees and plants resistant and sensitive to environmental changes in air pollution. Sohari is no different, with more than 25,800m2 of green areas and 24,500 trees planted in and around the facility. This has the added benefits of providing a more comfortable environment for the staff and local population and offsetting some of the CO2 output from the plant.

These ‘ecology gardens’ are continually monitored as they act as a real-world indicators to air quality. Each site is broadening its green patches and constantly monitoring air pollution in neighbouring communities. A monthly task for each facility is the ‘One Stream Clean-up’ programme where Kia staff clean and maintain local, natural streams. This is not only to monitor their cleanliness but also to keep them well maintained for the local communities to enjoy.

The overall effect of the many green initiatives – reducing the use of raw materials, recycling more and reducing waste – has resulted in Sohari being officially recognised as an eco-friendly worksite by the Korean Ministry of the Environment.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Things we think you'll want to know

  1. Why has it taken six years to turn the GT Concept into a production car?
  2. There are three reasons. The first is that we wanted to enhance our brand's positioning so that a model like Stinger would be sustainable within our line-up. The Kia of 2018 is very different to the Kia of 2011, when the GT Concept was revealed. Kia is now a design-led challenger brand, not one known purely for mass-market   transport rooted in value. Then we had to find somewhere to build it. That became possible when we introduced the K9/K900 luxury saloon (not sold in the UK), which is also rear-wheel drive. Stinger goes down the same production line. And finally we were determined to undertake arguably the most rigorous testing regime for any car in our history to ensure that Stinger would be an authentic gran turismo.          
  1. Was there ever a time when you thought it would never make it into production?
  2. Our President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume jokingly say that they had a bet – for a case of champagne – over whether a car based on the GT Concept would ever be produced, but the truth is that there was always great enthusiasm from all within Kia for a car like Stinger. Peter Schreyer says the faces of senior management would light up whenever the subject of a gran turismo was raised at planning meetings. The important thing was for us to get the timing right, from both a marketing and a practical standpoint.    

 

  1. The 2011 concept car was called GT, and you had a second concept car named Stinger. Why switch the names?
  2. Everyone within Kia felt that 'GT' was too bland a name for a car as stunning as Stinger, and it is also a name used by several other manufacturers. We think 'Stinger' perfectly describes the style, character and intent of our new gran turismo.   

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you considered making it front-wheel drive?
  2. No. From the outset it was decreed that if we were going to produce a classic-style gran turismo, it had to be rear-wheel drive.

 

  1. Was a V8 engine ever under consideration for the GT S?
  2. No. We could fit one under the bonnet, but Kia's policy is to downsize engines to improve fuel economy and emissions, and to use turbocharging and direct injection to ensure they deliver the performance we seek. We think a 4.7-second 0-60mph time for the ’GT S’ with a twin-turbo V6 is a pretty impressive acceleration figure.

 

  1. What are your sales predictions, which model is likely to be the major seller and will there be much of a fleet market for Stinger?
  2. We expect to sell around 1,800 in the UK in 2018, with ‘GT-Line S’ the most popular trim level. Retail sales will account for around 60 per cent of the total.

 

Now that you have stuck a toe in the water with Stinger, will there be more cars outside your mainstream line-up of saloons, hatchbacks, SUVs and estates?

  1. Two factors always govern our planning decisions: is there a business case, and can we produce different kinds of car without disrupting the output of our existing models? If the answer to both questions is 'yes' then we will go ahead. Kia management, designers and engineers are just as much car people as those with any other company, and they are eager to stretch their imaginations and talents.   

 

 

Ends 

For further information on Kia please visit www.kiapressoffice.com or contact:

Stephen Kitson
Director of Corporate Communications

E: skitson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 075 M: 07795 011 936

Daniel Sayles
Press Relations Manager

E: dsayles@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 073 M: 07747 149 149

Sara Robinson
Senior Press Officer

E: srobinson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 072 M: 07919 482 332

Moyosola Fujamade
Press Officer (Events)

E: mfujamade@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 069 M: 07471 216 343

Lauren Martin
Press Officer (Press Fleet)

E: lmartin@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 071 M: 07557 268 252

Chloe Farmer
Press Office Assistant

E: cfarmer@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 079 M: 07795 011 475

Follow Kia on twitter @KiaUKPR
Follow Kia at www.facebook.com/kiamotorsuk
Watch Kia at www.youtube.com/kiamotorsuk

 

The new Kia Stinger - Jan 2018

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

All the facts and figures                                                                   

2.2-litre CRDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 2,199

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 85.4 x 96

 Power output

 bhp

 197 @ 3,800rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 440 (325) @ 1,750-2,750rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 16.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line DOHC common rail direct-injection

turbocharged

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.385

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs, 320mm (front) and solid discs, 315mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max.

 kg

 1,913 / 1,810

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max.

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 7.3

 Maximum speed

 mph

 143

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 38.7 / 56.5 / 48.7

 CO2

 g/km

154

 

 

2.0 T-GDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 1,998

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 86 x 86

 Power output

 bhp

 244 @ 6,200 rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 353 (260) @ 1,400-3500rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line direct-injection turbocharged with CVVT

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.727

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs all round, 345mm (front) and 330mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,717 / 1,833

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 5.8

 Maximum speed

 mph

 149

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 26.6 / 44.1 / 35.8

 

 CO2

 g/km

 181

 

 

3.3 T-GDi V6

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 6 / 24

 Displacement

 cc

 3,342

 Bore / stroke

 mm

 92 x 83.8

 Power output

 bhp

 365 @ 6,000rpm

 Torque output

 Nm

 510 (376) @ 1,300–4,500 rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0: 1

 Engine details

 

 Twin-turbocharged V6 with direct injection

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.665

 2.396

 1.610

 1.190

 1.000

 0.826

 0.643

 0.556

 2.273

 3.538

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Braking system

 Brembo ventilated discs all round, 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy 8J x 19 front;    8.5J x 19 rear

 Tyres

 225/40 R19 front; 255/35 R19 rear

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2.905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,855 / 1,907

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 4.7

 Maximum speed

 mph

 168

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg    

 

 20.8 / 36.2 / 28.5

 CO2

 g/km   

 

 225

 

All-New Kia Stinger GT S

THE KIA STINGER GT S  
Short story

  • Kia's first grand tourer and first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Fastback-style 5-door gran turismo based on Kia GT Concept
  • Evokes memories of the golden age of beautiful grand tourers
  • Powered by a 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 engine
  • 0-60mph in 4.7 seconds – faster than any previous Kia
  • Eight-speed automatic gearbox
  • Adjustable electronic all-independent suspension
  • Equipped with state-of-the-art driver aids and connectivity systems
  • Head-up display of essential driver information among a number of firsts    for Kia

Kia is bringing back the golden age of beautiful and elegant high-performance gran turismo cars with the stunning Stinger GT S, the most adventurous model in the company's history.

The Stinger GT S is the first classic grand tourer from Kia and the first rear-wheel-drive model the company has introduced to Europe. With power coming from a 365bhp direct-injection twin-turbo V6 engine driving through an eight-speed automatic gearbox, it is also the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds.    

Six years in the making, it has evolved from the Kia GT Concept revealed at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. In the intervening years many people questioned whether Kia would be bold enough to step outside its comfort zone and sanction a production model, but the company was simply waiting until the time was right to do so. That time is now. 

The Stinger GT S was designed at Kia's Frankfurt studios under the watch of President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume. Prototypes have covered the equivalent of 27 trips around the Equator – taking in extreme climate testing in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North and South America – to perfect the car, and many development models have done at least 480 laps (10,000 kilometres) of the tortuous Nürburgring Nordschleife. The testing regime was headed by Kia's Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, Albert Biermann.

The GT S is the first of what will eventually be a five-model Stinger range, with further versions due to be launched alongside the GT S.  As the fastest and most powerful of the five, it features electronic suspension damping and Brembo brakes, while its advanced technologies include a comprehensive suite of electronic driver assistance systems, full connectivity and a head-up display (HUD) of essential driver information onto the windscreen. The HUD and electronic tilt and reach adjustment of the steering column are yet more firsts for Kia in Europe.      

A gran turismo, not a sports car
The Stinger GT S is not a hard-edged sports car created to be brutally fast at the expense of comfort. Rather, it is about the joy of the journey, where getting to the final destination can be an anti-climax.

"The Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive," says Gregory Guillaume. "This car is all about the journey. It's about passion. To embody that passion we believe that proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, the width and the height – even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical." The Stinger GT S is 4,830mm long, 1,870mm wide and just 1,400mm tall, and has a 2,905mm wheelbase.

It was inspired by the elegant grand tourers Guillaume saw as a child growing up in 1970s France, wafting their occupants effortlessly from Paris to St Tropez and other glamour spots on the Riviera. Even as a young boy Guillaume was drawing his own ideas for elegant grand tourers, hoping that one day they might become reality. They were his inspiration for the 2011 GT Concept and, subsequently, the Stinger.     

The car exhibits classic gran turismo proportions – long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase, cabin positioned towards the rear of the car, lengthy rear overhang beneath broad shoulders and a 'Coke-bottle' nip in the waist. It sets a template for Kia's bold and exciting future and is the final step in the company's transition from a manufacturer of purely rational, durable, value-centric cars to one able to compete with the world's best for desirability, design and technology.    

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose' grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights, bold rear diffuser with quad tailpipes and 19-inch wheels.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. At the front there are air curtains and finned gills behind the wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of the car called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as smooth as possible without diluting the stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

An interior fit for cross-continent travel
The luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung Nappa leather seats. There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system, and leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the partially chromed gearshifter.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To further ensure a perfect driving position for any driver, there is electronic tilt and reach adjustment of the steering column.      

The luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

For comfort in all climates, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages –  to be projected onto the windscreen. There is also a 360-degree Around-View monitor.  

One of the highlights of the infotainment features is a concert hall-quality, 15-speaker harman/kardon™ premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. The infotainment system incorporates a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control.    

Powertrain perfectly tuned for long-distance touring
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be powerful. The 3.3-litre V6 twin-turbo engine chosen for the Stinger GT S is ideally suited to the car's role as a long-distance gran turismo.

It makes the GT S the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph. The engine is a member of the Lambda II family and develops its 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It drives the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox, designed in-house, which rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. The transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A limited slip differential is fitted so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is included. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the engine, the GT S is fitted with an Active Sound System – another first for Kia. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Sportiness with comfort: the ideal gran turismo combination
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous, and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, culminating in the mileage accumulated by prototypes around the Nürburgring, the Stinger GT S meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.       

The fully independent suspension features MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up with double wishbones at the rear. The Stinger GT S introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting with more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

The Stinger GT S has a variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS), and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.             

The brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engine. There are 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear) ventilated brake discs. The brakes were co-developed with Brembo and are holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.    

The Stinger GT S rides on 19-inch alloy wheels with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Fully equipped for a modern gran turismo
The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

Advanced driver aids include Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

The Stinger GT S also has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.  

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Kia Connected Services with TomTom gives access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, plus a wireless charger for powering mobile devices.       

Warranty and Servicing
The extensive testing regime means that the Stinger GT S is able to enjoy the same seven-year/100,000-mile warranty as any of the company's other models. This declaration of faith in the car's reliability and quality covers all labour and parts except those subject to normal wear and tear, and is transferable if the car is sold before the time/mileage limit expires.

The car is also available with Care 3 and Care 3 Plus servicing packages for retail customers. These cover the cost of all routine servicing work for three or five years respectively and, like the warranty, can be passed on if the car is sold before they expire.

UK line-up:

Model

Power bhp

Torque

Nm

0-60 sec

Max speed mph

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 3.3 T-GDi V6

365

510

4.7

168

28.5

225

 

AT A GLANCE 
An instant guide to our stunning new gran turismo

General

  • Five-door, five-seater grand tourer
  • Takes Kia into a new market sector
  • Kia's first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Captures the style and character of cars from the golden age of grand tourers
  • Evolved from the Kia GT Concept unveiled at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show
  • Designed in Europe with input from the main design centre at Namyang in South Korea
  • Prototypes have completed 1.1 million kilometres of testing – 27 times around the world
  • Many development cars have done 10,000 kilometres – 480 laps – around the Nürburgring
  • Built at Sohari in South Korea

Design

  • Halo performance car and a template for Kia's bold and exciting future
  • Classic gran turismo proportions with a long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase and long rear overhang with broad shoulders
  • 'Coke-bottle' nip in waist
  • Typical Kia identifiers include 'tiger-nose' grille between complex headlights, castellated windscreen and simple, unadorned flanks
  • Special aerodynamic features include front air curtains, wheel-arch gills, a smooth underbody tray and an integrated rear diffuser
  • 19-inch alloy wheels
  • Quad exhaust pipes
  • Cocooning intimacy with space for five and their luggage
  • 406-litre boot with rear seats in use and 1,114 litres with them folded
  • Winged dashboard with high horizontal sweep interrupted only by central touchscreen
  • Nappa leather upholstery
  • Leather also trims D-shaped steering wheel, gearshifter, dashboard and door armrests
  • Aeronautically inspired air vents
  • Aluminium finish centre console, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, suede headlining and stainless steel door scuff plates emphasise gran turismo luxury and quality

Technical

  • 365bhp 3.3-litre direct-injection twin-turbo V6 T-GDi engine
  • The fastest-accelerating Kia ever (0-60mph in 4.7 seconds)
  • Eight-speed automatic transmission
  • Rear-wheel drive
  • MacPherson strut front suspension with multi-link rear suspension
  • Electronically controlled Dynamic Stability Damping Control
  • Suspension of right-hand-drive cars benefits from additional testing on UK roads
  • Rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) with drive select modes and variable gear ratio
  • Ventilated disc brakes front and rear, developed with Brembo
  • Limited Slip Differential
  • 225/40 R19 front tyres and 255/35 R19 at the rear
  • Body constructed from 55 per cent high-strength steels for strength with lightness

Technology

  • Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, High Beam Assist, Speed Limit Information warning, Driver Attention warning and an Active Bonnet to protect pedestrians in a collision
  • Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert
  • Vehicle Stability Management system incorporates dynamic torque vectoring
  • 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system, Kia Connected Services with TomTom and Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ voice control integration
  • Bluetooth with music streaming, a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and a 7.0-inch full-colour Thin Film Transistor supervision cluster
  • Customisable head-up display of essential driver information onto the windscreen plus electronic rake and reach adjustable steering column are firsts for Kia in Europe
  • 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker
  • 360-degree Around View Monitor and a wireless mobile phone charger 

 

THE DESIGN STORY
How the Kia GT Concept became the Stinger GT S

In 2011 Kia unveiled its GT Concept on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show. It was created at the company's European design studios next door to the show site, and a pointer to the fact that Kia did not intend to remain rooted in its then range of workaday hatchbacks, saloons, estates and SUVs forever. Since that day, the most frequently asked question at Kia events has been "when are you going to put the GT into production".    

Gregory Guillaume, the Head of the European design studio, says: “All of our concept cars have a reason; a purpose. They are not designers' indulgences. They illustrate what we are thinking. Ultimately, what matters is what comes onto the street, not what stays in the design studio – and we knew the GT Concept would, one day, go in to production.”

So, when a rear-wheel-drive gran turismo based on the GT Concept was signed off for production, where better to turn than Guillaume and the Frankfurt studio, with the whole project being overseen by Peter Schreyer, Kia’s President of Design and Chief Design Officer.

Turning a concept into a production car is no small feat, however. "On a concept car everything is exaggerated. It's an abstract," says Guillaume. "Actually, we think the production car came out nicer than the project car – there were some areas we were never really satisfied with, like the C-pillar. So we started to change that area and it affected the whole car."

Exterior
The idea behind the concept car was simple. It would echo the spirit of iconic 1970s gran turismo cars, the elegant and powerful vehicles capable of powering passengers from Paris to the Côte d'Azur for the weekend in impeccable style and at high speed. "As a child growing up in France in the 1970s, I was unconstrained by the limits of engineering and I drew cars that were, to my eyes, beautiful, dynamic, original and, of course, very fast. I believed those dreams could be a reality.

"Those dreams were the inspiration for the GT concept in 2011. It embodied that grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive or gauche. But it was more than just a design exercise. Once Stinger was given the green light for production, the idea was to channel the spirit of those iconic gran turismos to create something emotional and elegant."

The GT Concept embodied grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive. “We were convinced from day one that we would take this concept car from motor show plinth to the road, knowing that we have the freedom within Kia to stretch the brand in many directions," says Guillaume. “Stinger is not about outright power, hard-edged dynamics and brutal styling at the expense of luxury, comfort and grace. Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive at the destination – this car is all about the journey. It’s about passion."

Guillaume believes that to embody that passion, proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, width and height – and even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical.

Key to its road presence are its rear-wheel-drive proportions – a long bonnet and short 830mm front overhang, an extended wheelbase (2,905mm) to deliver a spacious cabin, and a long rear overhang (1,095mm) with strong, broad shoulders. Stinger’s stance, proportion and visual balance are designed to lend the car an air of elegance and athleticism, rather than aggression and brutality. Stinger measures 4,830mm in length and 1,870mm in width, and is 1,400 tall. The ‘Coke-bottle’ shape of the car’s flanks highlight the shoulder line, as well as the fastback silhouette.

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose' grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreenand the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights, bold rear diffuser, quad tailpipes and 19-inch wheels.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. At the front there are air curtains and finned gills behind the wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting the stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

Schreyer says: “You cannot believe how excited I am about this car. Stinger is going to fundamentally change the global image of Kia. It will revolutionise the way people think about us. It’s going to propel us upwards into a different era.”

Interior
External gran turismo visual cues are complemented by the layout and atmosphere of the low-slung cabin, with a steeply-raked windscreen and high dashboard running along a horizontal plane. The dashboard’s centre console is split into two specific areas: the infotainment controls sit neatly below a large colour touchscreen, while the climate and ventilation controls are lower down. In front of the driver is a thick, leather-wrapped D-shaped steering wheel and a single instrument binnacle with a combination of analogue and digital instrumentation. The large gauges are ringed in metal and accentuated with sweeping red needles.

The luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung Nappa leather seats. The two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To ensure that all drivers can find the perfect position behind the wheel there is also electronic rake and reach adjustment of the steering column – a first for Kia in Europe. Yet another first for the company is a height-adjustable Head-Up display of essential driver information onto the windscreen – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages. 

There is 974mm of headroom in the front and only slightly less – 939mm – in the rear. The respective figures for legroom are 1,083mm and 925mm, and for shoulder room they are 1,433mm and 1,391mm. The boot capacity with the 60:40 split rear seats upright is 406 litres, which extends to 1,114 litres when they are lowered.      

The wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which is partially chromed.

The luxurious ambience is emphasised by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

For comfort in all climates, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a 360-degree Around-View monitor. 

One of the highlights of the infotainment centre is a concert hall-quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. The system also includes a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with voice recognition and music streaming.        

“Working on this car was a dream. I still get a buzz, a thrill when I think about it, and I have been thinking about it for a very long time. It fills me with pride, and now I just cannot wait to see it on the road,” says Guillaume.

THE TESTING STORY  
27 times around the world to hone the car to perfection

The Nürburgring Nordschleife (North Loop) is known as 'The Green Hell' for very good reason. It runs for more than 13 miles through the Eifel mountains in Germany, and contains 73 corners, a 300-metre difference in height between its highest and lowest points and gradients of up to 17 per cent.

Driving round it demands constant hard acceleration and braking and heavy cornering. There are changing surfaces and cambers offering an unrivalled test of a car's dynamic prowess. As a test facility it is merciless, which is why Kia has established a base there. Every new model – including the Stinger GT S – is tested there to hone its suspension, steering and brakes. The testing regime for the GT S was so punishing that brake pads had to be changed half way through each day.

During the development of the Stinger GT S, prototypes were put through at least 10,000 kilometres, or 480 laps, of high-stress driving around the Nordschleife – not to set a lap time which would be irrelevant to customers, but to ensure the finished product would be a genuine gran turismo. One diesel prototype completed 20,000 km around the Nordschleife. The engine had already covered the full 10,000-kilometre testing distance, but further work to the chassis meant engineers needed to test a series of new components. With new parts fitted, the same powertrain completed a second 10,000-kilometre run.

The automatic transmission was a key focus for powertrain testing. Nordschleife testing identified a need to manage heat in the transmission more efficiently: initially, the temperature of the gearbox oil was rising higher than what was deemed acceptable by the engineers. To counteract this, an oil cooler with a larger surface area was adopted.

Suspension and steering
Stinger’s dynamics presented the engineers with a new challenge. Because this was going to be a totally new kind of car for Kia, the chassis engineers were given a blank canvas for the  suspension and steering characteristics. Their brief was to create a true gran turismo which  would drive the way it looks. The shape of the car inspired efforts to imbue Stinger with agile handling and high levels of body control for enthusiastic drivers, but with a compliant ride that would ensure high-speed cruising comfort over long distances.

The Stinger GT S has MacPherson struts at the front and fully-independent multi-link suspension with wishbones at the rear plus a new adaptive damping system – Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC). DSDC adapts the stroke length of the dampers on the move, and is controlled by acceleration, braking and steering sensors.

Drivers can change the characteristics of the shock absorbers via the Drive Mode Selector, which offers Comfort, Eco, Sport, Sport+ and Smart settings. In Normal mode, low levels of damping force ensure maximum cruising comfort. The suspension continues to firm up slightly under heavy cornering, but the effect is less pronounced than in Sport mode.

The rack-mounted variable-ratio motor-driven power steering system (R-MDPS) provided the chassis engineers with great flexibility for tuning. It allows drivers to choose between two steering modes – Comfort and Sport – via the Drive Mode Selector. These change the level of steering effort required, and also the variable steering ratio.

In Sport mode, the Stinger GT S requires increased on-centre steering effort, and has shorter gearing, reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Comfort mode reduces the steering effort from the on-centre position for more measured steering responses at a cruise and requires more effort as the steering wheel turns, with a linear build-up of resistance to give drivers greater confidence. The result is a steering system providing the same duality as the suspension.

Right-hand-drive versions of the Stinger GT S were put through a further level of dynamic testing in the UK to hone the steering and suspension for the country's uniquely challenging roads.

Brakes
The 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 in the Stinger GT S enables the car to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in just 4.7 seconds, making it the fastest-accelerating production Kia ever. Its high-performance brakes therefore needed to be equal to the task.

To ensure this would be the case, a rigorous range of braking challenges was devised, taking in the Grossglockner High Alpine Road in the Austrian Alps for constant downhill brake testing. Private test facilities in Northern Germany and Eastern Spain, as well as the Nürburgring, were also used.

The brakes not only had to offer strong and consistent braking power. A reassuring and responsive feel to the pedal was also demanded by the engineers, even after repeated heavy braking, for maximum driver confidence. More development work has been carried out on the Stinger’s brakes than on any previous Kia.

They were co-developed with Brembo. The 350mm front and 340mm Brembo ventilated discs are holed and grooved, providing high heat capacity and reduced fade levels under repeated heavy use. They are paired with the most powerful calipers ever found on a Kia.

Kia’s internal tests are designed to validate brakes at temperatures of up to 700°C (1,292°F). Engineers went even further for the Brembo brake system, with temperatures rising to more than 800°C (1,472°F). Even at these temperatures, the brakes continue to offer consistent stopping power and pedal feel.

All roads and all weathers
Kia did not confine Stinger testing to the Nürburgring. Prototypes have been driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator – to test the car’s durability. Extreme climate testing took place across Europe, the Middle East, Asia and North and South America. The Stinger GT S was subjected to extreme cold and heat and high altitudes, and faced the unique demands of the desert, permafrost regions, congested city centres and mountain passes.

The GT S was plunged into Arctic winters to ensure predictable, stable, gran turismo handling in all conditions with the engaging, fun-to-drive character of a rear-wheel drive car. From the development facility in Arjeplog in Swedish Lapland, Kia honed the car in a range of low-grip environments, including a skid-pan, handling circuit and slalom test on the surface of the frozen Uddjaure lake. Kia’s winter test regime saw the Stinger GT S being driven in temperatures as low as -35°C (-31°F).

On-road refinement was equally important, but customers also want to enjoy the sound of the engine at work. The Stinger GT S is the first Kia with an Active Sound system to enhance the engine note via the car’s audio system rather than through an actuator which channels noise into the cabin.

The Active Sound system was engineered in Europe and is consistent with the engine, so that occupants are treated to an authentic V6 note from the 3.3-litre twin-turbo unit. Sound engineers paired the system with the car's Drive Mode Selector so that drivers can change the level of engine noise in the cabin. The sound becomes slightly louder and more aggressive in tone as drivers switch modes.   

Albert Biermann, Kia’s Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, says: “Testing the car in extreme conditions allowed us to focus on its stability and predictability in every configuration and in all driving conditions. Crucially, these tests allowed us to engineer a car which retains the driving appeal that buyers look for in a gran turismo. We want enthusiastic drivers to be able to enjoy the thrill of driving their Stinger in all conditions without compromising on safety.”

THE TECHNICAL STORY 
Powertrain, suspension, steering and brakes befitting a grand tourer

Everything about the Stinger GT S has been engineered to ensure it is an authentic modern gran turismo. From its torquey twin-turbo direct-injection engine to its eight-speed automatic transmission, fully independent suspension with switchable modes, powerful brakes and variable steering, it is a car built for covering long distances swiftly, comfortably and safely while delivering maximum driving pleasure.

The body is composed of 55 per cent high-strength steels to keep weight to a minimum so that the Stinger GT S is as lithe and agile as it looks while ensuring robustness in the event of an accident,  and there is a battery of advanced driver assistance systems to make that accident less likely. And extensive work on sound-deadening ensures it is exceptionally refined, but occupants can still enjoy the sporting tones of the V6 engine thanks to an Active Sound system –­ the first in a Kia.

The 3.3-litre V6 twin-turbo T-GDi engine
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be fast. The twin-turbo engine chosen for the Stinger GT S is ideally suited to the car's role as a long-distance gran turismo.

The 3.3-litre direct-injection twin-turbo V6 T-GDi makes the Stinger GT S the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph. The engine is a member of the Lambda II range and produces 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It features an aluminium block and heads and was developed during a rigorous testing regime focused on responsiveness and efficiency with durability and reliability. There are twin single-scroll turbochargers, an air-cooled intercooler and an integral turbo and exhaust manifold to reduce weight. An electronic wastegate and thermostat help to improve responsiveness. Continuous-variable valve timing (CVVT) enhances intake operation range and operation speed while reducing pumping losses. There are sodium-filled exhaust valves to boost performance and efficiency with maximum durability.

The extensive testing regime to ensure durability and responsiveness also helped efficiency: combined fuel consumption is 28.5mpg, while CO emissions are 225g/km.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined and authentic V6 tones of the twin-turbo engine, the Stinger GT S is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound system. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector. 

Eight-speed automatic gearbox
The Stinger GT S drives the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. The transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A Limited Slip Differential is fitted so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are pumped into the air when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

Running gear
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous, and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, the Stinger GT S meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.      

The suspension is fully independent through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, while adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC) allows the damping force to be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC permits the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting with more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is fitted, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.            

The brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are 350mm ventilated discs at the front and 340mm ventilated discs at the rear. The brakes were co-developed with Brembo and employ 13.8-inch front and 13.4-inch rear discs, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.   

The Stinger GT S has 19-inch alloy wheels with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Safety
The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear.

The safety provisions begin with the sturdy body, 55 per cent of which is composed of high-strength steels so that rigidity and crash protection do not come at the expense of excessive weight. Structural adhesives are used extensively and there is strengthening around the attachment points for the powertrain and chassis, where loads are most concentrated in the vehicle’s frame. By also strengthening the longitudinal and transverse structures and using an engine bay strut bar, the frame exceeds competitive car standards.

In terms of crashworthiness, the Stinger GT S exceeds all competitors. The side member is formed from 80 K-class steel, the rear lower member is formed from 150 K-class steel and as much available crash space as possible has been included. The lightweight high-stiffness body is so strong that it surpasses European car standards.

To achieve this, the lower part of the body, a critical area in a collision, is made of hot stamped, ultra-high-strength steel with a large steel plate. Carefully defined load paths channel impact forces away from the passenger cell, and there are seven airbags – including one for the driver's knees – to protect occupants.   

However, the Stinger GT S has been engineered to ensure that, as much as possible, such features will never be needed thanks to a comprehensive network of advanced driver assistance systems. There is Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet which springs upwards upon impact provides additional protection for pedestrians' heads by increasing the distance between the head and the hard points under the engine bay.

There is Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

 

FULL EQUIPPED IN EVERY RESPECT      
Unique flagship for what will eventually be a five-car range 

The Stinger GT S is the flagship version of what will eventually be a five-model range in the UK. Further versions will be added later in 2018.

As the halo model in the Kia line-up, it lacks for nothing in terms of equipment, and features an extensive range of advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity services as standard. Nappa leather upholstery and leather trim, a power-adjustable memory driver's seat, heated seats and steering wheel, a smart key entry system with an engine start/stop button and an 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation and infotainment system are just a few of the specification highlights, while among the firsts for Kia in Europe are an adjustable full-colour head-up display and electronic rake and reach steering adjustment. 

Advanced connectivity and driver assistance systems
Kia develops its advanced driver assistance systems under the Drive Wise banner. In the Stinger GT S, it encompasses Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist and High Beam Assist, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver. An Active Bonnet provides additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

There is Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system.

The touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. The Stinger GT S also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports and a wireless phone charger.

Luxury in every respect
The luxurious interior of the Stinger GT S is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into low-slung Nappa leather seats. There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also is partially chromed.

The front seats have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To ensure that all drivers can find the perfect position behind the wheel, there is also electronic rake and reach adjustment of the steering column.

The Stinger GT S has dual automatic air conditioning, a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and the customisable head-up display projecting key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages –onto the windscreen, while a 360-degree around-view monitor is especially helpful when parking. 

One of the highlights of the infotainment centre is a concert hall-quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. There is also a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with voice recognition and music streaming.    

Nineteen-inch alloy wheels are fitted and house 350mm front and 340mm rear ventilated brake discs co-developed with Brembo.

The Stinger GT S also has an electric one-touch sunroof and LED headlamps, daytime running lights and tail lamps. There are quad exhaust pipes.

To emphasise the quality designed and engineered into the Stinger GT S, the luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

 

THE TECHNOLOGY STORY    
The best in advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity

The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey. The navigation instructions – along with other essential information such as the car's speed plus audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information – are displayed on the windscreen through a height-adjustable full-colour head-up display, which is a first for Kia.

The advanced driver aids are controlled by cameras and radar to supplement the driver's vision and reactions. They are not there to take over the operation of the car or to spoil the driver's enjoyment in driving it.

Kia develops its advanced driver assistance systems under the Drive Wise banner. In the Stinger GT S, it encompasses Autonomous Emergency Braking, which employs both short- and long-range radar systems so that it can detect vehicles and pedestrians at greater distances and higher speeds. The short-range radar operates at typical city speeds of up to 31mph. Between 19mph and 50mph the longer-range radar also comes into play to detect obstacles in the car's path and respond by automatically slowing the car, to a complete stop if necessary. The pedestrian detection function operates at up to 37mph.

Lane Keep Assist prevents the driver from straying into an adjoining lane accidentally. If the driver begins to change lane without first indicating, Stinger will issue audible and visual alerts and, if no action is taken, steer itself back into lane. Lane Keep Assist is therefore more effective than a simple lane departure warning.

One reason why drivers might inadvertently change lanes is that they are becoming tired. Stinger mitigates against that through its Driver Attention Warning. Through a camera and sensors it first builds up a profile of the driving style of the person behind the wheel. If it then detects significant variations from that profile it alerts the driver that it is time to take a break.

High Beam Assist automatically adjusts the headlight beam range between main and dipped according to other traffic and local lighting. The Stinger GT S also has a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces.

An Active Bonnet provides additional protection for pedestrians in a collision, springing upwards to give greater space between the head of the person in the collision and the hard points in the engine bay.

The Stinger GT S has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. A reversing camera is included.

To ensure occupants remain fully connected on any journey the Stinger GT S is linked to Kia Connected Services with TomTom, supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

Kia Connected Services with TomTom are accessed through the 8.0-inch touchscreen. The information available to drivers includes live traffic updates, weather reports, speed camera locations and local point-of-interest searches, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants and hotels.

Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are available when the system is paired with Android smartphones running 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher or an iPhone 5 and newer versions of the Apple handset. Both allow occupants to connect to various apps and functions, including voice-guided, hands-free calls and texts and voice recognition. Android Auto gives access to Google maps navigation and Google Play music, while Apple CarPlay links to pre-loaded maps, music, podcasts, texts and messages and audiobooks, all through Siri voice control. The Stinger GT S also has Bluetooth with music streaming and voice control and a wireless mobile device charger.

 

THE OWNERSHIP STORY 
The reliability, warranty and affordable running costs expected of a Kia

The Stinger GT S may be a completely new kind of Kia – but it is still a Kia. That means it has the reliability to sustain Kia's industry-leading seven-year or 100,000-mile warranty, which – as with every one of the company's models – is supplied as standard.

Every prototype was driven for at least 10,000 kilometres around the Nürburgring Nordschleife, not only to hone the car's dynamic abilities, but also to ensure Stinger would be just as durable as any other Kia. Prototypes were also driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator ­– on all kinds of roads and in the most extreme climates to test the car's durability. Right-hand-drive versions were further tested in the UK to ensure they could meet the unique challenges posed by the country's roads.   

The Stinger GT S is extensively equipped and does not require buyers to spend a small fortune on options to bring the car up to an aceptable specification. And while a car such as the Stinger GT S can never be cheap to run, ownership costs are far from outlandish.

Fuel consumption (mpg) and CO2 (g/km)

Model

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

28.5

225

 

Benefit-in-kind taxation rates and VED (2017-18)

Model

Tax rate

VED first year/thereafter

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

37%

£1,200/£450*


* For five years: £140 per year thereafter

Insurance group

Model

1-50

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

41


Servicing
6,000 miles or every six months, whichever comes sooner

Care-3 and Care-3 Plus – Kia’s service packages for retail customers – are available and offer fixed-cost and inflation-proof servicing for the first three or five years. All work is carried out by trained technicians using genuine Kia replacement parts and specified oils. Both packages cover the car, not the owner, so are transferable should the vehicle be sold.  If a vehicle with a Care-3 package is sold on then the next owner may upgrade to the five-year service package. 

Warranty and support
Kia set a new benchmark in 2007 when it launched the cee'd with an industry-best seven-year warranty.  That demonstration of faith in the quality and reliability of Kia products has subsequently been extended to every model.

A major benefit is that it is transferable to subsequent owners at no charge as long as the seven-year time limit has not been reached and the mileage is below 100,000.  If the car is sold when less than 18 months old or with less than 18,000 miles on the clock, the warranty is topped up to match that of a new model.

The mechanical warranty is supported by a 12-year anti-perforation warranty and a five-year paint warranty plus one-year Europe-wide roadside assistance through KIAssist.

 

MANUFACTURING AND THE ENVIRONMENT    
Built in South Korea on a special rear-wheel-drive production line

The Stinger GT S is built at Kia's Sohari factory in South Korea, on a special production line dedicated to rear-wheel-drive cars. The same line also builds the Kia K9 (K900 in America and Quoris in some Middle East and South America markets), and is a relatively new addition to the Sohari plant, emphasising the versatility of Kia production facilities and the company's willingness to adapt to suit its changing market ambitions and global image.

Sohari is the place where it all started for Kia as we know it today: the plant opened in June 1973. It is located within greater Seoul, on a 500,000m2 site to the south-west of the city centre, and currently has a staff of just under 5,300. Sohari is capable of building 350,000 cars a year. Stinger production is not limited, so output can be adapted to accommodate demand.

Sohari may be Kia’s oldest plant, but it has been extensively modernised to improve its efficiency and the lives of the people working there, reduce its impact on the environment and to ensure that the quality of cars leaving the factory gates is at an all-time high.

Although only about 2 per cent of a car’s lifetime CO2 emissions are created during manufacture, this can still amount to a substantial figure when multiplied by the total production capacity of a factory. So, even small improvements can add up to major reductions when rolled out across the entire production network. All Kia plants are working to reduce their impact on the environment by putting in place clean and efficient processes.

In recent years the focus at Sohari has been on developing ever more flexible production systems. As part of that, staff have been encouraged to find and adopt  innovative production activities.  Everyone at Sohari has been helping to make the plant less wasteful and more environmentally friendly. As a result, the plant has been one of Kia’s leading lights in environmental change.

Improved painting facilities have been installed, and every aspect of vehicle production has been under scrutiny to ensure the plant uses less energy and produces less waste. Water and power consumption, dust and CO2 emissions per vehicle produced and contaminants and waste volumes have all been reduced.

Kia has made reducing the amount of raw materials being fed into the production process a major priority in every production facility around the globe. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in reducing waste, increasing recycling and developing cleaner production processes.

Exhaust pollutants from Sohari have also decreased dramatically – dust, NOx and SO2 output have all been reduced.

New technology is playing a significant part in environmental improvement. Typical cast melting furnaces produce large amounts of dust and contained within this is a high proportion of zinc. The captured dust is treated and the zinc extracted before being re-used within the production process.

More technology is employed in the machining shops where gearboxes are produced. Compressed air is used as a coolant when machining intricate gearbox internals, rather than cutting oil. This and the associated oil mist are problem pollutants and the new scheme is helping reduce oil use.

The green landscape around each facility is an important part of each plant make-up. One ongoing programme is based on a number of ‘ecology gardens’ which are filled with trees and plants resistant and sensitive to environmental changes in air pollution. Sohari is no different, with more than 25,800m2 of green areas and 24,500 trees planted in and around the facility. This has the added benefits of providing a more comfortable environment for the staff and local population and offsetting some of the CO2 output from the plant.

These ‘ecology gardens’ are continually monitored as they act as a real-world indicators to air quality. Each site is broadening its green patches and constantly monitoring air pollution in neighbouring communities. A monthly task for each facility is the ‘One Stream Clean-up’ programme where Kia staff clean and maintain local, natural streams. This is not only to monitor their cleanliness but also to keep them well maintained for the local communities to enjoy.

The overall effect of the many green initiatives – reducing the use of raw materials, recycling more and reducing waste – has resulted in Sohari being officially recognised as an eco-friendly worksite by the Korean Ministry of the Environment.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Things we think you'll want to know

  1. Why has it taken six years to turn the GT Concept into a production car?
  2. There are three reasons. The first is that we wanted to enhance our brand's positioning so that a model like the Stinger GT S would be sustainable within our line- up. The Kia of 2018 is very different to the Kia of 2011, when the GT Concept was revealed. Kia is now a design-led challenger brand, not one known purely for mass- market transport rooted in value. Then we had to find somewhere to build it. That became possible when we introduced the K9/K900 luxury saloon (not sold in the UK),   which is also rear-wheel drive. The Stinger GT S goes down the same production line.  And finally we were determined to undertake arguably the most rigorous testing regime for any car in our history to ensure that Stinger would be an authentic gran   turismo.         

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you thought it would never make it into production?
  2. Our President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume jokingly say that they had a bet – for a case of champagne – over whether a car based on the GT Concept would ever be produced, but the truth is that there was always great enthusiasm from all within Kia for a car like the Stinger GT S. Peter Schreyer says the faces of senior management would light up whenever the subject of a gran turismo was raised at planning meetings. The important thing was to get the timing right, from both a marketing and a practical standpoint.   

 

  1. The 2011 concept car was called GT, and you had a second concept car named Stinger. Why switch the names?
  2. Everyone within Kia felt that 'GT' was too bland a name for a car as stunning as the Stinger GT S, and it is also a name used by several other manufacturers. We think 'Stinger' perfectly describes the style, character and intent of our new gran turismo.   

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you considered making it front-wheel drive?
  2. No. From the outset it was decreed that if we were going to produce a classic-style gran turismo, it had to be rear-wheel drive.

 

  1. Was a V8 engine ever under consideration for the GT S?
  2. No. We could fit one under the bonnet, but Kia's policy is to downsize engines to improve fuel economy and emissions, and to use turbocharging and direct injection to ensure they deliver the performance we seek. We think a 4.7-second 0-60mph time is a pretty impressive acceleration figure.

 

Now that you have stuck a toe in the water with Stinger, will there be more cars outside your mainstream line-up of saloons, hatchbacks, SUVs and estates?
Two factors always govern our planning decisions: is there a business case, and can we produce different kinds of car without disrupting the output of our existing models? If the answer to both questions is 'yes' then we will go ahead. Kia management, designers and engineers are just as much car people as those with any other company, and they are eager to stretch their imaginations and talents.   

Ends 

For further information on Kia please visit www.kiapressoffice.com or contact:

Stephen Kitson
Director of Corporate Communications

E: skitson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 075 M: 07795 011 936

Daniel Sayles
Press Relations Manager

E: dsayles@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 073 M: 07747 149 149

Sara Robinson
Senior Press Officer

E: srobinson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 072 M: 07919 482 332

Moyosola Fujamade
Press Officer (Events)

E: mfujamade@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 069 M: 07471 216 343

Lauren Martin
Press Officer (Press Fleet)

E: lmartin@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 071 M: 07557 268 252

Chloe Farmer
Press Office Assistant

E: cfarmer@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 079 M: 07795 011 475

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All-New Kia Stinger and Stinger GT S

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS - STINGER
All the facts and figures                                                                   

2.2-litre CRDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 2,199

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 85.4 x 96

 Power output

 bhp

 197 @ 3,800rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 440 (325) @ 1,750-2,750rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 16.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line DOHC common rail direct-injection

turbocharged

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.385

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs, 320mm (front) and solid discs, 315mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max.

 kg

 1,778 / 1,881

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max.

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 7.3

 Maximum speed

 mph

 143

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 42.8 / 57.6 / 50.4

 CO2

 g/km

154

 

 2.0 T-GDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 1,998

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 86 x 86

 Power output

 bhp

 244 @ 6,200 rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 353 (260) @ 1,400-3500rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line direct-injection turbocharged with CVVT

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.727

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs all round, 345mm (front) and 330mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,717 / 1,833

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 5.8

 Maximum speed

 mph

 149

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 23.6 / 44.1 / 35.8

 

 CO2

 g/km

 181

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS - STINGER GT S
All the facts and figures  

3.3 T-GDi V6

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 6 / 24

 Displacement

 cc

 3,342

 Bore / stroke

 mm

 92 x 83.8

 Power output

 bhp

 365 @ 6,000rpm

 Torque output

 Nm

 510 (376) @ 1,300–4,500 rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0: 1

 Engine details

 

 Twin-turbocharged V6 with direct injection

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.665

 2.396

 1.610

 1.190

 1.000

 0.826

 0.643

 0.556

 2.273

 3.538

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Braking system

 Brembo ventilated discs all round, 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy 8J x 19 front;    8.5J x 19 rear

 Tyres

 225/40 R19 front; 255/35 R19 rear

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2.905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,855 / 1,907

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 4.7

 Maximum speed

 mph

 168

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg    

 

 20.8 / 36.2 / 28.5

 CO2

 g/km   

 

 225

 

 

GENERAL

The new Kia Stinger - Jan 2018

THE NEW KIA STINGER
Short story

  • Kia's first grand tourer and first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Fastback-style 5-door gran turismo based on Kia GT Concept
  • Evokes memories of the golden age of beautiful grand tourers
  • Three turbocharged engines, all with an eight-speed automatic gearbox
  • Range-topping model powered by a 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 engine capable of 0-60mph in 4.7 seconds – faster than any previous Kia
  • All-independent suspension, adjustable in range-topping model
  • Three distinct trim lines in a five-model range
  • Equipped with state-of-the-art driver aids and connectivity systems

Kia is bringing back the golden age of beautiful and elegant high-performance gran turismo cars with the stunning Stinger, the most adventurous model in the company's history.

Stinger is the first classic grand tourer from Kia and the first rear-wheel-drive model the company has introduced to Europe. In range-topping twin-turbo V6 guise it is also the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds.    

Six years in the making, it has evolved from the Kia GT Concept revealed at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. In the intervening years many people questioned whether Kia would be bold enough to step outside its comfort zone and sanction a production model, but the company was simply waiting until the time was right to do so. That time is now. 

Stinger was designed in Europe at the Frankfurt studios under the watch of President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume. Prototypes have covered the equivalent of 27 trips around the Equator, taking in extreme climate testing in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North and South America, to perfect the car, and many development cars have done at least 480 laps (10,000 kilometres) of the tortuous Nürburgring Nordschleife. The testing regime was headed by Kia's Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, Albert Biermann.

Five versions of the car are available in the UK, all with turbocharged direct-injection engines mated to an eight-speed automatic gearbox and featuring state-of-the-art electronic driver aids and connectivity systems. The ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ offer the choice of a 2.0-litre 244bhp T-GDi petrol engine or a 2.2-litre 197bhp CRDi turbodiesel, while the range-topping  ‘GT S’ is sold exclusively with a 3.3-litre 365bhp twin-turbo V6. The  ‘GT S’, as the fastest and most powerful model in the range, also has electronic suspension damping and Brembo brakes.      

A gran turismo, not a sports car
Stinger is not a hard-edged sports car created to be brutally fast at the expense of comfort. Rather, it is about the joy of the journey, where getting to the final destination can be an anti-climax.

"The Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive," says Gregory Guillaume. "This car is all about the journey. It's about passion. To embody that passion we believe that proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, the width and the height – even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical." Stinger is 4,830mm long, 1,870mm wide and just 1,400mm tall, and has a 2,905mm wheelbase.

It was inspired by the elegant grand tourers Guillaume saw as a child growing up in 1970s France, wafting their occupants effortlessly from Paris to St Tropez and other glamour spots on the Riviera. Even as a young boy Guillaume was drawing his own ideas for elegant grand tourers, hoping that one day they might become reality. They were his inspiration for the 2011 GT Concept and, subsequently, Stinger.     

Stinger exhibits classic gran turismo proportions – long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase, cabin positioned towards the rear of the car, lengthy rear overhang beneath broad shoulders and a 'Coke-bottle' nip in the waist. It sets a template for Kia's bold and exciting future and is the final step in the company's transition from a manufacturer of purely rational, durable, value-centric cars to one able to compete with the world's best for desirability, design and technology.    

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights and bold rear diffuser with quad tailpipes on petrol models and twin tailpipes on diesels. There are 18-inch alloy wheels on ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions and 19-inch wheels on ’GT S’.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. There are air curtains at the front and finned gills behind the rear wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting its stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

An interior fit for cross-continent travel
Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’.   

There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated.     

The luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor.  

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control.   

In GT-Line there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while GT-Line S and GT S have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.    

Powertrains perfectly tuned for long-distance touring
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be powerful . The three turbocharged engines chosen for Stinger are ideally suited to its role as a long-distance gran turismo.

On the one hand the 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph, while on the other the 2.2-litre CRDi's combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg gives it a touring range of comfortably more than 600 miles. In between there is the 2.0-litre T-GDi offering much of the best of both: acceleration from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds with combined fuel economy of 35.8mpg, allowing it to cover more than 450 miles before the driver will need to stop for fuel.   

The 2.0-litre T-GDI (Turbocharged Gasoline Direct injection) engine is from the Theta II family. It develops 244bhp at 6,200rpm and 353Nm of torque all the way from 1,400 to 3,500rpm, ensuring outstanding driveability. The 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 is a member of the Lambda II range and can deliver 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm. The 2.2-litre CRDi is from the R family, developed and made in Korea, and delivers 197bhp at 3,800rpm and 440Nm of torque, also across a wide range – 1,750 to 2,750rpm.

All versions drive the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. Stinger’s transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A limited slip differential is fitted to all models so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines, the car is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound System. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Sportiness with comfort: the ideal gran turismo combination
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, culminating in the mileage accumulated by prototypes around the Nürburgring, Stinger meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.       

All versions have fully independent suspension through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, but there are two different systems. ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ have a passive set-up, while ’GT S’ introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting which introduces more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is available in ‘GT S’, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.             

Stinger's brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are ventilated discs of varying size at all four corners for the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 models, with ventilated front discs and solid rear discs for the 2.2-litre CRDi models.  

The brakes for the 3.3-litre ’GT S’ were co-developed with Brembo and are 350mm front and 340mm rear discs, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.    

There are 18-inch alloy wheels with 225/45 R18 tyres for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’, while the ’GT S’ has 19-inch alloys with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Fully equipped of a modern gran turismo
Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.  

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a wireless phone charger.       

Warranty and Servicing
The extensive testing regime undertaken with Stinger means that it enjoys the same seven-year/100,000-mile warranty as any of the company's other models. This declaration of faith in the car's reliability and quality covers all labour and parts except those subject to normal wear and tear, and is transferable if the car is sold before the time/mileage limit expires.

UK line-up:

Model

Power bhp

Torque

Nm

0-60 sec

Max speed mph

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi GT-Line

244

353

5.8

149

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi GT-Line

197

440

7.3

143

48.7

154

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi GT-Line S

244

353

5.8

149

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi GT-Line S

197

440

7.3

143

48.7

154

Stinger 3.3 T-GDi V6

365

510

4.7

168

28.5

225

 

AT A GLANCE  
An instant guide to our stunning new gran turismo

General

  • Five-door, five-seater fastback-style grand tourer
  • Takes Kia into a new market sector
  • Kia's first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Captures style and character of cars from golden age of grand tourers
  • Evolved from the Kia GT Concept unveiled at 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show
  • Designed in Europe with input from main design centre at Namyang in Korea
  • Five models based on three powertrains and three trim grades
  • Many prototypes have completed 1.1 million kilometres of testing – 27 times around world
  • Many development cars have done 10,000 kilometres – 480 laps – around Nürburgring
  • Built at Sohari in South Korea

Design

  • Stinger is a halo performance car and a template for Kia's bold and exciting future
  • Classic gran turismo proportions with a long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase and long rear overhang with broad shoulders
  • 'Coke-bottle' nip in waist
  • Typical Kia identifiers include 'tiger-nose' grille between complex headlights, castellated windscreen and simple, unadorned flanks
  • Special aerodynamic features include front air curtains, wheel-arch gills, a smooth underbody tray and an integrated rear diffuser
  • 18-inch alloy wheels for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ and 19-inch alloys on ’GT S’
  • Twin exhaust pipes on diesels and quad exhausts on petrol models
  • Cocooning intimacy with space for five and their luggage
  • 406-litre boot with rear seats in use and 1,114 litres with them folded
  • Winged dashboard with high horizontal sweep interrupted only by central touchscreen
  • Leather (‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’) or Nappa leather (’GT S’) upholstery
  • Leather also trims D-shaped steering wheel, gearshifter, dashboard and door armrests
  • Five aeronautically inspired air vents
  • Aluminium finish centre console, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, suede headlining and stainless steel door scuff plates emphasise gran turismo luxury and quality

Technical

  • Three turbocharged engines
  • 244bhp 2.0-litre turbo and 197bhp 2.2-litre turbodiesel for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’
  • 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 for ’GT S’
  • ’GT S’ is fastest-accelerating Kia ever (0-60mph in 4.7 seconds)
  • Eight-speed automatic transmission fitted to all versions
  • Rear-wheel drive
  • MacPherson strut front suspension with multi-link rear suspension
  • Electronically controlled Dynamic Stability Damping Control on ’GT S’
  • Suspension of right-hand-drive cars benefits from additional testing on UK roads
  • Rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) with two modes standard, with variable gear ratio in ’GT S’
  • Ventilated disc brakes front and rear, developed with Brembo, for ’GT S’
  • Limited Slip Differential standard
  • 225/45 R18 tyres for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line’ S; 225/40 R19 (front) and 255/35 R19 (rear) for ’GT S’
  • Body constructed from 55 per cent high-strength steels for strength with lightness

Technology

  • All models feature Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, High Beam Assist, Speed Limit Information warning, Driver Attention Warning and an Active Bonnet to protect pedestrians in a collision
  • ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ add Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert
  • Vehicle Stability Management system incorporates dynamic torque vectoring
  • 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system, Kia Connected Services with TomTom and Android Auto and Apple CarPlay with voice control standard
  • All models also feature Bluetooth with music streaming, a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility, a customisable head-up display and a 7.0-inch full-colour Thin Film Transistor supervision cluster
  • Nine-speaker audio system with under-seat subwoofer in ‘GT-Line’; 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’
  • ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree Around View Monitor and a wireless mobile phone charger 

 

THE DESIGN STORY    
How the Kia GT Concept became the Stinger

In 2011 Kia unveiled its GT Concept on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show. It was created at the company's European design studios next door to the show site, and a pointer to the fact that Kia did not intend to remain rooted in its then range of workaday hatchbacks, saloons, estates and SUVs forever. Since that day, the most frequently asked question at Kia events has been "when are you going to put the GT into production".    

Gregory Guillaume, the Head of the European design studio, says: “All of our concept cars have a reason, a purpose. They are not designers' indulgences. They illustrate what we are thinking. Ultimately, what matters is what comes on to the street, not what stays in the design studio – and we knew the GT Concept would, one day, go in to production.”

So, when a rear-wheel-drive gran turismo based on the GT Concept was signed off for production, where better to turn than Guillaume and the Frankfurt studio, with the whole project being overseen by Peter Schreyer, Kia President of Design and Chief Design Officer.

Turning a concept into a production car is no small feat, however. "On a concept car everything is exaggerated. It's an abstract," says Guillaume. "Actually, we think the production car came out nicer than the project car – there were some areas we were never really satisfied with, like the C-pillar. So we started to change that area and it affected the whole car."

Exterior
The idea behind the concept car was simple. It would echo the spirit of iconic 1970s gran turismo cars, the elegant and powerful vehicles capable of powering passengers from Paris to the Côte d'Azur for the weekend in impeccable style and at high speed. "As a child growing up in France in the 1970s, I was unconstrained by the limits of engineering and I drew cars that were to my eyes, beautiful, dynamic, original and, of course, very fast. I believed those dreams could be a reality.

"Those dreams were the inspiration for the GT concept in 2011. It embodied that grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive or gauche. But it was more than just a design exercise. Once Stinger was given the green light for production, the idea was to channel the spirit of those iconic gran turismos to create something emotional and elegant."

The GT Concept embodied grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive. “We were convinced from day one that we would take this concept car from motor show plinth to the road, knowing that we have the freedom within Kia to stretch the brand in many directions," says Guillaume. “Stinger is not about outright power, hard-edged dynamics and brutal styling at the expense of luxury, comfort and grace. Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive at the destination – this car is all about the journey. It’s about passion."

Guillaume believes that to embody that passion, proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, width and height – and even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical.

Key to its road presence are its rear-wheel-drive proportions – a long bonnet and short
830mm front overhang, an extended wheelbase (2,905mm) to deliver a spacious cabin, and a long rear overhang (1,095mm) with strong, broad shoulders. Stinger’s stance, proportion and visual balance are designed to lend the car an air of elegance and athleticism, rather than aggression and brutality. Stinger measures 4,830mm in length and 1,870mm in width, and is 1,400 tall. The ‘Coke-bottle’ shape of the car’s flanks highlight the shoulder line, as well as the fastback silhouette.

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights and bold rear diffuser. There are 18-inch alloy wheels on ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions and 19-inch wheels on ’GT S’.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. There are air curtains at the front and finned gills behind the rear wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting its stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

Schreyer says: “You cannot believe how excited I am about this car. Stinger is going to fundamentally change the global image of Kia. It will revolutionise the way people think about us. It’s going to propel us upwards into a different era.”

Interior
External gran turismo visual cues are complemented by the layout and atmosphere of the low-slung cabin, with a steeply-raked windscreen and high dashboard running along a horizontal plane. The dashboard’s centre console is split into two specific areas: the infotainment controls sit neatly below a large colour touchscreen, while the climate and ventilation controls are lower down. In front of the driver is a thick, leather-wrapped steering wheel and a single instrument binnacle with a combination of analogue and digital instrumentation. The large gauges are ringed in metal and accentuated with sweeping red needles.

Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’. There is 974mm of headroom in the front and only slightly less – 939mm – in the rear. The respective figures for legroom are 1,083mm and 925mm, and for shoulder room they are 1,433mm and 1,391mm. The boot capacity with the 60:40 split rear seats upright is 406 litres, which extends to 1,114 litres when they are lowered.      

The wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are heated. The chunky transmission tunnel that separates the driver and passenger compartments reinforces the car’s rear-drive layout.

The luxurious ambience is emphasised by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor. 

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with and music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control. In ‘GT-Line’ there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while ‘GT-Line S’and ’GT S’ have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.  

“Working on this car was a dream. I still get a buzz, a thrill when I think about it, and I have been thinking about it for a very long time. It fills me with pride, and now I just cannot wait to see it on the road,” says Guillaume.

 

THE TESTING STORY      
Stinger has been 27 times around the world to hone it to perfection

The Nürburgring Nordschleife (North Loop) became known as 'The Green Hell' for very good reason. It runs for more than 13 miles through the Eifel mountains in Germany, and contains 73 corners, a 300-metre difference in height between its highest and lowest points, and has gradients of up to 17 per cent.

Driving round it demands constant hard acceleration and braking and heavy cornering. There are changing surfaces and cambers offering an unrivalled test of a car's dynamic prowess. As a test facility it is merciless, which is why Kia has established a base there. Every new model – including Stinger – is tested there to hone its suspension, steering and brakes. The testing regime was so punishing that brake pads had to be changed half way through each day.

During the development of Stinger, prototypes were put through at least 10,000 km, or 480 laps, of high-stress driving around the Nordschleife – not to set a lap time which would be irrelevant to customers, but to ensure the finished product would be a genuine gran turismo. One diesel prototype completed 20,000 km around the Nordschleife. The engine had already covered the full 10,000-kilometre testing distance, but further work to the chassis meant engineers needed to test a series of new components. With new parts fitted, the same powertrain completed a second 10,000-kilometre run.

The automatic transmission was a key focus for powertrain testing. Nordschleife testing identified a need to manage heat in the transmission more efficiently: initially, the temperature of the gearbox oil was rising higher than what was deemed acceptable by the engineers. To counteract this, an oil cooler with a larger surface area was adopted.

Suspension and steering
Stinger’s dynamics presented the engineers with a new challenge. Because this was going to be a totally new kind of car for Kia, the chassis engineers were given a blank canvas for the suspension and steering characteristics. Their brief was to create a true gran turismo which would drive the way it looks. The shape of the car inspired efforts to imbue Stinger with agile handling and high levels of body control for enthusiastic driver, but with a compliant ride that would ensure high-speed cruising comfort over long distances.

Two different types of suspension resulted. Every Stinger has MacPherson struts at the front and fully-independent multi-link suspension at the rear. However, the ‘clean sheet’ approach allowed the engineers to create both a traditional passive setup and a new adaptive system – Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC). DSDC adapts the stroke length of the dampers on the move, and is controlled by acceleration, braking and steering sensors.

Drivers can change the characteristics of the shock absorbers via the Drive Mode Selector, which offers five modes - Eco, Normal, Sport, Sport + and Smart settings. In Normal mode, low levels of damping force ensure maximum cruising comfort. The suspension continues to firm up slightly under heavy cornering, but the effect is less pronounced than in Sport mode. DSDC is fitted as standard to the 3.3-litre V6 Stinger.

The passive suspension was designed to the same brief as the DSDC system. It was verified alongside DSDC at the Nürburgring Nordschleife and on the road. It is based on Kia’s most refined multi-link suspension, but has been redesigned with stiffer springs and stabiliser bars for more immediate handling responses.

Stinger’s rack-mounted motor-driven power steering system (R-MDPS) provided the chassis engineers with greater flexibility for tuning. Fitted to the Stinger GT S, R-MDPS lets drivers choose between two steering modes via the Drive Mode Selector: Normal and Sport. These modes change the level of steering effort required, and also the variable steering ratio.

In Sport mode, Stinger requires increased on-centre steering effort, and has shorter gearing, reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Normal mode reduces the steering effort from the on-centre position for more measured steering responses at a cruise. Normal mode also requires more effort as the steering wheel turns, with a linear build-up of resistance to give drivers greater confidence. The result is a steering system providing the same duality as the suspension – one that’s as relaxing and confidence-inspiring to use in a straight line as it is immediate and engaging on more enjoyable roads.

Right-hand-drive versions of the Stinger were put through a further level of dynamic testing in the UK to hone the steering and suspension for the country's uniquely challenging roads.

Brakes
The 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 in the Stinger ’GT S’ enables the car to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in just 4.7 seconds, making it the fastest-accelerating production Kia ever. Its high-performance brakes therefore needed to be equal to the task.

To ensure this would be the case, a rigorous range of braking challenges was devised, taking in the famous Grossglockner High Alpine Road in the Austrian Alps for constant downhill brake testing. Private test facilities in Northern Germany and Eastern Spain, as well as the Nürburgring, were also used.

Stinger’s brakes not only had to offer strong and consistent braking power. A reassuring and responsive feel to the pedal was also demanded by the engineers, even after repeated heavy braking, for maximum driver confidence. More development work has been carried out on the Stinger’s brakes than on any previous Kia.

The ’GT S’ features a new braking system developed with Brembo. The 350mm front and 340mm Brembo discs are holed and grooved, providing high heat capacity and reduced fade levels under repeated heavy use. They are paired with the most powerful calipers ever found on a Kia.

Early in Stinger’s development, engineers considered carbon ceramic brakes to maximise the braking power. However, as a Kia, Stinger needed to remain affordable to buy and maintain. Brembo’s brakes proved more than up to what was required of them.

Kia’s internal tests are designed to validate brakes at temperatures of up to 700°C (1,292°F). Engineers went even further for the Brembo brake system, with temperatures rising to more than 800°C (1,472°F). Even at these temperatures, Stinger’s brakes continue to offer onsistent braking power and pedal feel.

All roads and all weathers 
Kia did not confine Stinger testing to the Nürburgring. Prototypes have been driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator – to test Stinger's durability. Extreme climate testing took place across Europe, the Middle East, Asia and North and South America. Stinger was subjected to extreme cold and heat and high altitude, and faced the unique demands of the desert, permafrost regions, congested city centres and mountain passes.

Stinger was plunged into Arctic winters to ensure predictable, stable, gran turismo handling in all conditions with the engaging, fun-to-drive character of a rear-wheel drive car. From the development facility in Arjeplog in Swedish Lapland, Kia honed Stinger in a range of low-grip environments, including a skid-pan, handling circuit and slalom test on the surface of the frozen Uddjaure lake. Kia’s winter test regime saw the car being driven in temperatures as low as -35°C (-31°F).

Stinger‘s on-road refinement was equally important, but customers also want to enjoy the sound of the engine at work. Stinger is the first Kia with an Active Sound system to enhance the engine note via the car’s audio rather than through an actuator which channels noise into the cabin. 

The Active Sound system was engineered in Europe and is consistent with the type of engine. The 3.3-litre engine authentically enhances the distinctive V6 engine note, while the 2.0-litre T-GDi lets drivers enjoy the sportier character of the four-cylinder unit under acceleration.

The system also refines the sound of the 2.2-litre diesel engine, masking certain elements and enhancing others for a more refined note.

Sound engineers have paired the system with Stinger’s Drive Mode Selector, enabling drivers to change the level of engine noise in the cabin. The sound becomes slightly louder and more aggressive in tone as drivers switch modes.   

Albert Biermann, Kia’s Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, says: “Testing the car in extreme conditions allowed us to focus on its stability and predictability in every configuration and in all driving conditions. Crucially, these tests allowed us to engineer a car which retains the driving appeal that buyers look for in a gran turismo. We want enthusiastic drivers to be able to enjoy the thrill of driving their Stinger in all conditions without compromising on safety.”

 

THE TECHNICAL STORY   
Powertrains, suspension, steering and brakes befitting a grand tourer

Everything about Stinger has been engineered to ensure it is an authentic modern gran turismo. From its torquey turbocharged engines to its eight-speed automatic transmission, fully independent suspension – with switchable modes in the ’GT S’ – powerful brakes and variable steering, it is a car built for covering long distances swiftly, comfortably and safely while delivering maximum driving pleasure.

The body is composed of 55 per cent high-strength steels to keep weight to a minimum so that Stinger is as lithe and agile as it looks while ensuring robustness in the event of an accident, and there is a battery of advanced driver assistance systems to make that accident less likely. And extensive work on sound-deadening ensures it is as refined as it is comfortable, but occupants can still enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines thanks to an Active Sound system –­ the first in a Kia.

Three turbocharged engines
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be fast. The three turbocharged engines chosen for Stinger are ideally suited to its role as a long-distance gran turismo.

On the one hand the 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph, while on the other the 2.2-litre CRDi's combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg gives it a touring range of comfortably more than 600 miles. In between there is the 2.0-litre T-GDi offering much of the best of both: acceleration from 0-60mph in 5.8 seconds with combined fuel economy of 35.8mpg, allowing it to cover more than 450 miles before the driver will need to stop for fuel.   

The 2.0-litre, 1,998cc T-GDi (Turbocharged Gasoline Direct injection) engine is from the Theta II family. It is an all-aluminium unit with identical cylinder bore and piston stroke measurements of 86mm. In Stinger it develops 244bhp at 6,200rpm and 353Nm of torque all the way from 1,400 to 3,500rpm, ensuring outstanding driveability. The engine features a scroll turbocharger and continuously variable valve timing on both the inlet and exhaust sides.

Its low displacement conforms to Kia's policy of downsizing to maximise efficiency. Smaller engines cause less friction, while direct injection cools the charge down, allowing the engine to run leaner without causing detonation. The intake manifold is lightweight composite while the wastegate is electronically controlled for precise boost control at part throttle. The block is reinforced to deal with the load being placed upon it, and there are large coolant ports in the head for optimum heat dissipation.

The 2.0-litre T-GDi engine allows the Stinger to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in 5.8 seconds and on to a top speed of 149mph. Yet it is capable of 35.8mpg while cruising, while CO2 emissions are 181g/km.

The 3.3-litre, 3,342cc twin-turbo V6 T-GDi is a member of the Lambda II range and produces 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It features an aluminium block and heads and was developed during a rigorous testing regime focused on responsiveness and efficiency with durability and reliability. There are twin single-scroll turbochargers, an air-cooled intercooler and an integral turbo and exhaust manifold to reduce weight. An electronic wastegate and thermostat help to improve responsiveness. Continuously-variable valve timing (CVVT) enhances intake operation range and operation speed while reducing pumping loss. There are sodium-filled exhaust valves to boost performance and efficiency while offering structural reinforcement for improved durability.

The twin-turbo V6 makes Stinger the fastest-accelerating Kia ever. From standstill to 60mph takes just 4.7 seconds, and the top speed is 168mph where permitted. Yet the extensive testing regime to ensure durability and responsiveness has also helped efficiency: combined fuel consumption is 28.5mpg, while CO2 emissions are 225g/km.

The 2.2-litre CRDi is from the R family, developed and made in Korea, and delivers 197bhp at 3,800rpm and 440Nm of torque across a wide range – 1,750 to 2,750rpm. It is a 2,199cc 16-valve four-cylinder unit with chain-driven overhead camshafts and a variable geometry turbocharger and intercooler. The fourth-generation common-rail fuel injection system features piezo injectors, and the injection pressure is up to 2,000 bar. Other technical highlights include an actuator which gives precise turbocharger control for superior acceleration and fuel economy and a special coating to reduce friction on the piston skirt.

The intake manifold, cylinder head cover and oil filter housing are made of plastic to help trim weight. With an intake manifold featuring electronic swirl control and an exhaust gas filtration system that promotes the recirculation of clean, cool, low-pressure exhaust gas, the R-family diesel engine is clean and efficient.

With combined fuel consumption of 48.7mpg, the Stinger 2.2-litre CRDi is capable of travelling comfortably more than 600 miles on a single 60-litre fill-up, while its CO2 emissions are just 154g/km. But it is anything other than a poor relation to the petrol models for performance. Its strong and easily accessed torque allows it to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in 7.3 seconds, and the top speed is 143mph.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the Stinger's turbocharged engines, the car is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound system. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Eight-speed automatic gearbox
All versions of Stinger drive the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. Stinger’s transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A Limited Slip Differential is fitted to all models so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

Running gear
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, Stinger meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.      

All versions have fully independent suspension through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, but there are two different systems. ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ have a passive set-up, while ’GT S’ introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting which introduces more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is standard on the ‘GT S’, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.            

Stinger's brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are ventilated discs of varying size at all four corners for the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 3.3-litre T-GDi V6 models, with ventilated front discs and solid rear discs for the 2.2-litre CRDi models. 

The brakes for the 3.3-litre GT S were co-developed with Brembo and are 350mm front and 340mm rear, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.   

There are 18-inch alloy wheels with 225/45 R18 tyres for GT-Line and GT-Line S, while the GT S has 19-inch alloys with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Safety
Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear.

Stinger's safety provisions begin with its sturdy body, 55 per cent of which is composed of high-strength steels so that rigidity and crash protection do not come at the expense of excessive weight. Structural adhesives are used extensively and the attachment points for the powertrain and chassis, where loads are most concentrated in the vehicle’s frame, are extremely rigid. By strengthening the longitudinal and transverse structures and using an engine room strut bar, the frame exceeds competitive car standards.

In terms of crashworthiness, the Stinger exceeds all competitors. The side member is formed from 80 K-class steel. The rear lower member is formed from 150 K-class steel, and as much available crash space as possible has been included. To protect passengers in a rear collision, the lightweight high-stiffness body in white (BIW) is so strong that it surpasses European car standards.

To achieve this, the lower part of the body, a critical area in a collision, is made of hot stamped, ultra-high-strength steel with a large steel plate. Carefully defined load paths channel impact forces away from the passenger cell, and there are seven airbags – including one for the driver's knees – to protect occupants.   

However, Stinger has been engineered to ensure that, as much as possible, such features will not be needed through a comprehensive network of advanced driver assistance systems. All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

GT-Line S and GT S supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to reduce damage  to pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

 

RANGE FINDER  
Five models based on three powertrains and three trim levels 

There are five versions of Stinger in the UK, based on three powertrains and three trim grades. There are ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions powered by the 2.0-litre T-GDi and 2.2-litre CRDi engines, while the twin-turbo 3.3-litre V6 T-GDi is exclusively available in top-of-the-range ’GT S’ guise. All drive the rear wheels through an eight-speed automatic gearbox.

As halo models in the Kia line-up, all are luxuriously equipped, and feature an extensive range of advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity services as standard. Leather upholstery and trim, a power-adjustable memory driver's seat, heated seats and steering wheel, a smart key entry system with an engine start/stop button and an 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation and infotainment system are just a few of the highlights fitted to all five models. 

Advanced connectivity and driver assistance systems
All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, and there is Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally, and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information System.  

‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking g-force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom™, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a wireless phone charger.

A high standard specification for all versions
Stinger's luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung seats – leather in ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’ versions, and Nappa leather in ’GT S’.   

There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also has chrome sections.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated, and in ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ they are also ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated.    

To enhance comfort, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted to every model, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information –  to be projected onto the windscreen. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ also have a 360-degree around-view monitor. 

Every model has a DAB radio with MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth and music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control. In ‘GT-Line’ there is a nine-speaker sound system with front under-seat subwoofer, while ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have a concert hall quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It features Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback.

There are 18-inch alloy wheels for ‘GT-Line’ and ‘GT-Line S’, and 19-inch alloys with ’GT S’. ‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ have an electric one-touch sunroof and LED headlamps, and all versions have LED daytime running lights and tail lamps. There are quad exhaust pipes on petrol versions and dual exhausts on diesels. ’GT S’ has brakes co-developed with Brembo.

To emphasise the quality designed and engineered into Stinger, the luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

 

THE TECHNOLOGY STORY   
The best in advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity

Stinger may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

Stinger's advanced driver aids are controlled by cameras and radar to supplement the driver's vision and reactions. They are not there to take over the operation of the car or to spoil the driver's enjoyment in driving it.

All versions have Autonomous Emergency Braking, which employs both short- and long-range radar systems so that it can detect vehicles and pedestrians at greater distances and higher speeds. The short-range radar operates at typical city speeds of up to 31mph. Between 19mph and 50mph the longer-range radar also comes into play to detect obstacles in the car's path and respond by automatically slowing the car, to a complete stop if necessary. The pedestrian detection function operates at up to 37mph.

Lane Keep Assist is also standard, and prevents the driver from straying into an adjoining lane accidentally. If the driver begins to change lane without first indicating, Stinger will issue audible and visual alerts and, if no action is taken, steer itself back into lane. It is therefore more effective than a simple lane departure warning.

One reason why drivers might inadvertently change lanes is that they are becoming tired, Stinger mitigates against that through its Driver Attention Warning. Through a camera and sensors it first builds up a profile of the driving style of the person behind the wheel. If it then detects significant variations from that profile it then alerts the driver that it is time to take a break.

High Beam Assist, also standard, adjusts the headlight beam range between main and dipped according to other traffic and local lighting.

Stinger also has a Speed Limit Information System.  
‘GT-Line S’ and ’GT S’ supplement this with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of his or her eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces.

An Active Bonnet is standard with all three trim grades to reduce damage to pedestrians' heads in a collision.

Stinger has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Stinger also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom™, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

Kia Connected Services with TomTom™ are accessed through the 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system. The information available to drivers includes live traffic updates, weather reports, speed camera locations and local point-of-interest searches, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants and hotels.

The system is compatible with Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™, both of which are standard fitments. Android Auto is available when the system is paired with Android smartphones running 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher, while Apple CarPlay is compatible with iPhone 5 and newer versions of the Apple handset. Both allow occupants to connect to various apps and functions, including voice-guided, hands-free calls and texts and voice recognition. Android Auto gives access to Google maps navigation and Google Play music, while Apple CarPlay links to pre-loaded maps, music, podcasts, texts and messages and audiobooks, all through Siri voice control.

A reversing camera is standard and all models have Bluetooth with music streaming.    

 

 THE OWNERSHIP STORY 
The reliability, warranty and affordable running costs expected of a Kia

Stinger may be a completely new kind of Kia – but it is still a Kia. That means it has the reliability to sustain Kia's industry-leading seven-year or 100,000-mile warranty, which – as with every one of the company's models – is supplied as standard.

Every prototype was driven for at least 10,000 kilometres around the Nürburgring Nordschleife, not only to hone the car's dynamic abilities, but also to ensure Stinger would be just as durable as any other Kia. Prototypes were also driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator ­– on all kinds of roads and in the most extreme climates to test the car's durability. Right-hand-drive versions were further tested in the UK to ensure they could meet the unique challenges posed by the country's roads.   

All five versions of Stinger are extensively equipped and do not require buyers to spend a small fortune on options to bring the car up to an acceptable specification. And while a car such as Stinger can never be cheap to run, ownership costs are far from outlandish for a car such as this.

Fuel consumption (mpg) and CO2 (g/km)

Model

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

48.7

154

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

35.8

181

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

48.7

154

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

28.5

225

 

Benefit-in-kind taxation rates and VED (2017-18)

Model

Tax rate

VED first year/thereafter

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

35%

£800/£140

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

31%

£500/£140

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

35%

£800/£140

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

31%

£500/£140

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

37%

£1,200/£450*

 

* For five years: £140 per year thereafter

Insurance groups

Model

1-50

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line’

34

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line’

32

Stinger 2.0 T-GDi ‘GT-Line S’

36

Stinger 2.2 CRDi ‘GT-Line S’

34

Stinger 3.3 V6 ’GT S’

41

 

 Servicing

  • 6,000 miles or every six months (petrol)
  • 10,000 miles or every 12 months (diesel)

Warranty and support
Kia set a new benchmark in 2007 when it launched the cee'd with an industry-best seven-year warranty.  That demonstration of faith in the quality and reliability of Kia products has subsequently been extended to every model.

A major benefit is that it is transferable to subsequent owners at no charge as long as the seven-year time limit has not been reached and the mileage is below 100,000.  If the car is sold when less than 18 months old or with less than 18,000 miles on the clock, the warranty is topped up to match that of a new model.

The mechanical warranty is supported by a 12-year anti-perforation warranty and a five-year paint warranty plus one-year Europe-wide roadside assistance through KIAssist.

 

MANUFACTURING AND THE ENVIRONMENT   
Built in South Korea on a special rear-wheel-drive production line

Stinger is built at Kia's Sohari factory in South Korea, on a special production line dedicated to rear-wheel-drive cars. The same line also builds the Kia K9 (K900 in America and Quoris in some Middle East and South America markets), and is a relatively new addition to the Sohari plant, emphasising the versatility of Kia production facilities and the company's willingness to adapt to suit its changing market ambitions and global image.

Sohari is the place where it all started for Kia as we know it today: the plant opened in June 1973. It is located within greater Seoul, on a 500,000m2 site to the south-west of the city centre, and currently has a staff of just under 5,300. Sohari is capable of building 350,000 cars a year. Stinger production is not limited, so output can be modified to accommodate demand.

Sohari may be Kia’s oldest plant, but it has been extensively modernised to improve its efficiency and the lives of the people working there, reduce its impact on the environment and to ensure that the quality of cars leaving the factory gates is at an all-time high.

Although only about 2 per cent of a car’s lifetime CO2 emissions are created during manufacture, this can still amount to a substantial figure when multiplied by the total production capacity of a factory. So, even small improvements can add up to major reductions when rolled out across the entire production network. All Kia plants are working to reduce their impact on the environment by putting in place clean and efficient processes.

In recent years the focus at Sohari has been on developing ever more flexible production systems. As part of that, staff have been encouraged to find and adopt innovative production activities.  Everyone at Sohari has been helping to make the plant less wasteful and more environmentally friendly. As a result, the plant has been one of Kia’s leading lights in environmental change.

Improved painting facilities have been installed, and every aspect of vehicle production has been under scrutiny to ensure the plant uses less energy and produces less waste. Water and power consumption, dust and CO2 emissions per vehicle produced and contaminants and waste volumes have all been reduced.

Kia has made reducing the amount of raw materials being fed into the production process a major priority in every production facility around the globe. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in reducing waste, increasing recycling and developing cleaner production processes.

Exhaust pollutants from Sohari have also decreased dramatically – dust, NOx and SO2 output have all been reduced.

New technology is playing a significant part in environmental improvement. Typical cast melting furnaces produce large amounts of dust and contained within this is a high proportion of zinc. The captured dust is treated and the zinc extracted before being re-used within the production process.

More technology is employed in the machining shops where gearboxes are produced. Compressed air is used as a coolant when machining intricate gearbox internals, rather than cutting oil. This and the associated oil mist are problem pollutants and the new scheme is helping reduce oil use.

The green landscape around each facility is an important part of each plant make-up. One ongoing programme is based on a number of ‘ecology gardens’ which are filled with trees and plants resistant and sensitive to environmental changes in air pollution. Sohari is no different, with more than 25,800m2 of green areas and 24,500 trees planted in and around the facility. This has the added benefits of providing a more comfortable environment for the staff and local population and offsetting some of the CO2 output from the plant.

These ‘ecology gardens’ are continually monitored as they act as a real-world indicators to air quality. Each site is broadening its green patches and constantly monitoring air pollution in neighbouring communities. A monthly task for each facility is the ‘One Stream Clean-up’ programme where Kia staff clean and maintain local, natural streams. This is not only to monitor their cleanliness but also to keep them well maintained for the local communities to enjoy.

The overall effect of the many green initiatives – reducing the use of raw materials, recycling more and reducing waste – has resulted in Sohari being officially recognised as an eco-friendly worksite by the Korean Ministry of the Environment.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Things we think you'll want to know

  1. Why has it taken six years to turn the GT Concept into a production car?
  2. There are three reasons. The first is that we wanted to enhance our brand's positioning so that a model like Stinger would be sustainable within our line-up. The Kia of 2018 is very different to the Kia of 2011, when the GT Concept was revealed. Kia is now a design-led challenger brand, not one known purely for mass-market   transport rooted in value. Then we had to find somewhere to build it. That became possible when we introduced the K9/K900 luxury saloon (not sold in the UK), which is also rear-wheel drive. Stinger goes down the same production line. And finally we were determined to undertake arguably the most rigorous testing regime for any car in our history to ensure that Stinger would be an authentic gran turismo.          
  1. Was there ever a time when you thought it would never make it into production?
  2. Our President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume jokingly say that they had a bet – for a case of champagne – over whether a car based on the GT Concept would ever be produced, but the truth is that there was always great enthusiasm from all within Kia for a car like Stinger. Peter Schreyer says the faces of senior management would light up whenever the subject of a gran turismo was raised at planning meetings. The important thing was for us to get the timing right, from both a marketing and a practical standpoint.    

 

  1. The 2011 concept car was called GT, and you had a second concept car named Stinger. Why switch the names?
  2. Everyone within Kia felt that 'GT' was too bland a name for a car as stunning as Stinger, and it is also a name used by several other manufacturers. We think 'Stinger' perfectly describes the style, character and intent of our new gran turismo.   

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you considered making it front-wheel drive?
  2. No. From the outset it was decreed that if we were going to produce a classic-style gran turismo, it had to be rear-wheel drive.

 

  1. Was a V8 engine ever under consideration for the GT S?
  2. No. We could fit one under the bonnet, but Kia's policy is to downsize engines to improve fuel economy and emissions, and to use turbocharging and direct injection to ensure they deliver the performance we seek. We think a 4.7-second 0-60mph time for the ’GT S’ with a twin-turbo V6 is a pretty impressive acceleration figure.

 

  1. What are your sales predictions, which model is likely to be the major seller and will there be much of a fleet market for Stinger?
  2. We expect to sell around 1,800 in the UK in 2018, with ‘GT-Line S’ the most popular trim level. Retail sales will account for around 60 per cent of the total.

 

Now that you have stuck a toe in the water with Stinger, will there be more cars outside your mainstream line-up of saloons, hatchbacks, SUVs and estates?

  1. Two factors always govern our planning decisions: is there a business case, and can we produce different kinds of car without disrupting the output of our existing models? If the answer to both questions is 'yes' then we will go ahead. Kia management, designers and engineers are just as much car people as those with any other company, and they are eager to stretch their imaginations and talents.   

 

 

Ends 

For further information on Kia please visit www.kiapressoffice.com or contact:

Stephen Kitson
Director of Corporate Communications

E: skitson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 075 M: 07795 011 936

Daniel Sayles
Press Relations Manager

E: dsayles@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 073 M: 07747 149 149

Sara Robinson
Senior Press Officer

E: srobinson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 072 M: 07919 482 332

Moyosola Fujamade
Press Officer (Events)

E: mfujamade@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 069 M: 07471 216 343

Lauren Martin
Press Officer (Press Fleet)

E: lmartin@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 071 M: 07557 268 252

Chloe Farmer
Press Office Assistant

E: cfarmer@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 079 M: 07795 011 475

Follow Kia on twitter @KiaUKPR
Follow Kia at www.facebook.com/kiamotorsuk
Watch Kia at www.youtube.com/kiamotorsuk

 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

The new Kia Stinger - Jan 2018

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

All the facts and figures                                                                   

2.2-litre CRDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 2,199

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 85.4 x 96

 Power output

 bhp

 197 @ 3,800rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 440 (325) @ 1,750-2,750rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 16.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line DOHC common rail direct-injection

turbocharged

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.385

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs, 320mm (front) and solid discs, 315mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max.

 kg

 1,913 / 1,810

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max.

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 7.3

 Maximum speed

 mph

 143

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 38.7 / 56.5 / 48.7

 CO2

 g/km

154

 

 

2.0 T-GDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 1,998

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 86 x 86

 Power output

 bhp

 244 @ 6,200 rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 353 (260) @ 1,400-3500rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line direct-injection turbocharged with CVVT

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.727

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs all round, 345mm (front) and 330mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,717 / 1,833

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 5.8

 Maximum speed

 mph

 149

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 26.6 / 44.1 / 35.8

 

 CO2

 g/km

 181

 

 

3.3 T-GDi V6

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 6 / 24

 Displacement

 cc

 3,342

 Bore / stroke

 mm

 92 x 83.8

 Power output

 bhp

 365 @ 6,000rpm

 Torque output

 Nm

 510 (376) @ 1,300–4,500 rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0: 1

 Engine details

 

 Twin-turbocharged V6 with direct injection

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.665

 2.396

 1.610

 1.190

 1.000

 0.826

 0.643

 0.556

 2.273

 3.538

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Braking system

 Brembo ventilated discs all round, 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy 8J x 19 front;    8.5J x 19 rear

 Tyres

 225/40 R19 front; 255/35 R19 rear

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2.905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,855 / 1,907

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 4.7

 Maximum speed

 mph

 168

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg    

 

 20.8 / 36.2 / 28.5

 CO2

 g/km   

 

 225

 

KIA STINGER GT S

All-New Kia Stinger GT S

THE KIA STINGER GT S  
Short story

  • Kia's first grand tourer and first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Fastback-style 5-door gran turismo based on Kia GT Concept
  • Evokes memories of the golden age of beautiful grand tourers
  • Powered by a 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 engine
  • 0-60mph in 4.7 seconds – faster than any previous Kia
  • Eight-speed automatic gearbox
  • Adjustable electronic all-independent suspension
  • Equipped with state-of-the-art driver aids and connectivity systems
  • Head-up display of essential driver information among a number of firsts    for Kia

Kia is bringing back the golden age of beautiful and elegant high-performance gran turismo cars with the stunning Stinger GT S, the most adventurous model in the company's history.

The Stinger GT S is the first classic grand tourer from Kia and the first rear-wheel-drive model the company has introduced to Europe. With power coming from a 365bhp direct-injection twin-turbo V6 engine driving through an eight-speed automatic gearbox, it is also the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds.    

Six years in the making, it has evolved from the Kia GT Concept revealed at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. In the intervening years many people questioned whether Kia would be bold enough to step outside its comfort zone and sanction a production model, but the company was simply waiting until the time was right to do so. That time is now. 

The Stinger GT S was designed at Kia's Frankfurt studios under the watch of President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume. Prototypes have covered the equivalent of 27 trips around the Equator – taking in extreme climate testing in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and North and South America – to perfect the car, and many development models have done at least 480 laps (10,000 kilometres) of the tortuous Nürburgring Nordschleife. The testing regime was headed by Kia's Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, Albert Biermann.

The GT S is the first of what will eventually be a five-model Stinger range, with further versions due to be launched alongside the GT S.  As the fastest and most powerful of the five, it features electronic suspension damping and Brembo brakes, while its advanced technologies include a comprehensive suite of electronic driver assistance systems, full connectivity and a head-up display (HUD) of essential driver information onto the windscreen. The HUD and electronic tilt and reach adjustment of the steering column are yet more firsts for Kia in Europe.      

A gran turismo, not a sports car
The Stinger GT S is not a hard-edged sports car created to be brutally fast at the expense of comfort. Rather, it is about the joy of the journey, where getting to the final destination can be an anti-climax.

"The Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive," says Gregory Guillaume. "This car is all about the journey. It's about passion. To embody that passion we believe that proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, the width and the height – even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical." The Stinger GT S is 4,830mm long, 1,870mm wide and just 1,400mm tall, and has a 2,905mm wheelbase.

It was inspired by the elegant grand tourers Guillaume saw as a child growing up in 1970s France, wafting their occupants effortlessly from Paris to St Tropez and other glamour spots on the Riviera. Even as a young boy Guillaume was drawing his own ideas for elegant grand tourers, hoping that one day they might become reality. They were his inspiration for the 2011 GT Concept and, subsequently, the Stinger.     

The car exhibits classic gran turismo proportions – long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase, cabin positioned towards the rear of the car, lengthy rear overhang beneath broad shoulders and a 'Coke-bottle' nip in the waist. It sets a template for Kia's bold and exciting future and is the final step in the company's transition from a manufacturer of purely rational, durable, value-centric cars to one able to compete with the world's best for desirability, design and technology.    

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose' grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreen. And the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights, bold rear diffuser with quad tailpipes and 19-inch wheels.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. At the front there are air curtains and finned gills behind the wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of the car called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as smooth as possible without diluting the stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

An interior fit for cross-continent travel
The luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung Nappa leather seats. There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system, and leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the partially chromed gearshifter.

The seats are snug and enveloping, and the two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To further ensure a perfect driving position for any driver, there is electronic tilt and reach adjustment of the steering column.      

The luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede-feel headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

For comfort in all climates, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a customisable head-up display which allows key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages –  to be projected onto the windscreen. There is also a 360-degree Around-View monitor.  

One of the highlights of the infotainment features is a concert hall-quality, 15-speaker harman/kardon™ premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. The infotainment system incorporates a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with music streaming. Additionally Apple CarPlay™ and Android Auto™ offer voice control.    

Powertrain perfectly tuned for long-distance touring
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be powerful. The 3.3-litre V6 twin-turbo engine chosen for the Stinger GT S is ideally suited to the car's role as a long-distance gran turismo.

It makes the GT S the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph. The engine is a member of the Lambda II family and develops its 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It drives the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox, designed in-house, which rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. The transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A limited slip differential is fitted so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are released when the car is stationary, is included. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined sporting tones of the engine, the GT S is fitted with an Active Sound System – another first for Kia. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector according to which of the five programmable settings the driver has chosen. 

Sportiness with comfort: the ideal gran turismo combination
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous, and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, culminating in the mileage accumulated by prototypes around the Nürburgring, the Stinger GT S meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.       

The fully independent suspension features MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up with double wishbones at the rear. The Stinger GT S introduces adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC), which can be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC allows the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting with more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

The Stinger GT S has a variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS), and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.             

The brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engine. There are 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear) ventilated brake discs. The brakes were co-developed with Brembo and are holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.    

The Stinger GT S rides on 19-inch alloy wheels with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Fully equipped for a modern gran turismo
The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey.

Advanced driver aids include Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet is standard to provide additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

The Stinger GT S also has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.  

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. Kia Connected Services with TomTom gives access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports, plus a wireless charger for powering mobile devices.       

Warranty and Servicing
The extensive testing regime means that the Stinger GT S is able to enjoy the same seven-year/100,000-mile warranty as any of the company's other models. This declaration of faith in the car's reliability and quality covers all labour and parts except those subject to normal wear and tear, and is transferable if the car is sold before the time/mileage limit expires.

The car is also available with Care 3 and Care 3 Plus servicing packages for retail customers. These cover the cost of all routine servicing work for three or five years respectively and, like the warranty, can be passed on if the car is sold before they expire.

UK line-up:

Model

Power bhp

Torque

Nm

0-60 sec

Max speed mph

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 3.3 T-GDi V6

365

510

4.7

168

28.5

225

 

AT A GLANCE 
An instant guide to our stunning new gran turismo

General

  • Five-door, five-seater grand tourer
  • Takes Kia into a new market sector
  • Kia's first rear-wheel-drive car in the UK
  • Captures the style and character of cars from the golden age of grand tourers
  • Evolved from the Kia GT Concept unveiled at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show
  • Designed in Europe with input from the main design centre at Namyang in South Korea
  • Prototypes have completed 1.1 million kilometres of testing – 27 times around the world
  • Many development cars have done 10,000 kilometres – 480 laps – around the Nürburgring
  • Built at Sohari in South Korea

Design

  • Halo performance car and a template for Kia's bold and exciting future
  • Classic gran turismo proportions with a long bonnet, short front overhang, long wheelbase and long rear overhang with broad shoulders
  • 'Coke-bottle' nip in waist
  • Typical Kia identifiers include 'tiger-nose' grille between complex headlights, castellated windscreen and simple, unadorned flanks
  • Special aerodynamic features include front air curtains, wheel-arch gills, a smooth underbody tray and an integrated rear diffuser
  • 19-inch alloy wheels
  • Quad exhaust pipes
  • Cocooning intimacy with space for five and their luggage
  • 406-litre boot with rear seats in use and 1,114 litres with them folded
  • Winged dashboard with high horizontal sweep interrupted only by central touchscreen
  • Nappa leather upholstery
  • Leather also trims D-shaped steering wheel, gearshifter, dashboard and door armrests
  • Aeronautically inspired air vents
  • Aluminium finish centre console, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, suede headlining and stainless steel door scuff plates emphasise gran turismo luxury and quality

Technical

  • 365bhp 3.3-litre direct-injection twin-turbo V6 T-GDi engine
  • The fastest-accelerating Kia ever (0-60mph in 4.7 seconds)
  • Eight-speed automatic transmission
  • Rear-wheel drive
  • MacPherson strut front suspension with multi-link rear suspension
  • Electronically controlled Dynamic Stability Damping Control
  • Suspension of right-hand-drive cars benefits from additional testing on UK roads
  • Rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) with drive select modes and variable gear ratio
  • Ventilated disc brakes front and rear, developed with Brembo
  • Limited Slip Differential
  • 225/40 R19 front tyres and 255/35 R19 at the rear
  • Body constructed from 55 per cent high-strength steels for strength with lightness

Technology

  • Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist, High Beam Assist, Speed Limit Information warning, Driver Attention warning and an Active Bonnet to protect pedestrians in a collision
  • Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert
  • Vehicle Stability Management system incorporates dynamic torque vectoring
  • 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation system, Kia Connected Services with TomTom and Android Auto™ and Apple CarPlay™ voice control integration
  • Bluetooth with music streaming, a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and a 7.0-inch full-colour Thin Film Transistor supervision cluster
  • Customisable head-up display of essential driver information onto the windscreen plus electronic rake and reach adjustable steering column are firsts for Kia in Europe
  • 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker
  • 360-degree Around View Monitor and a wireless mobile phone charger 

 

THE DESIGN STORY
How the Kia GT Concept became the Stinger GT S

In 2011 Kia unveiled its GT Concept on the eve of the Frankfurt Motor Show. It was created at the company's European design studios next door to the show site, and a pointer to the fact that Kia did not intend to remain rooted in its then range of workaday hatchbacks, saloons, estates and SUVs forever. Since that day, the most frequently asked question at Kia events has been "when are you going to put the GT into production".    

Gregory Guillaume, the Head of the European design studio, says: “All of our concept cars have a reason; a purpose. They are not designers' indulgences. They illustrate what we are thinking. Ultimately, what matters is what comes onto the street, not what stays in the design studio – and we knew the GT Concept would, one day, go in to production.”

So, when a rear-wheel-drive gran turismo based on the GT Concept was signed off for production, where better to turn than Guillaume and the Frankfurt studio, with the whole project being overseen by Peter Schreyer, Kia’s President of Design and Chief Design Officer.

Turning a concept into a production car is no small feat, however. "On a concept car everything is exaggerated. It's an abstract," says Guillaume. "Actually, we think the production car came out nicer than the project car – there were some areas we were never really satisfied with, like the C-pillar. So we started to change that area and it affected the whole car."

Exterior
The idea behind the concept car was simple. It would echo the spirit of iconic 1970s gran turismo cars, the elegant and powerful vehicles capable of powering passengers from Paris to the Côte d'Azur for the weekend in impeccable style and at high speed. "As a child growing up in France in the 1970s, I was unconstrained by the limits of engineering and I drew cars that were, to my eyes, beautiful, dynamic, original and, of course, very fast. I believed those dreams could be a reality.

"Those dreams were the inspiration for the GT concept in 2011. It embodied that grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive or gauche. But it was more than just a design exercise. Once Stinger was given the green light for production, the idea was to channel the spirit of those iconic gran turismos to create something emotional and elegant."

The GT Concept embodied grace, flair and dynamism, without being aggressive. “We were convinced from day one that we would take this concept car from motor show plinth to the road, knowing that we have the freedom within Kia to stretch the brand in many directions," says Guillaume. “Stinger is not about outright power, hard-edged dynamics and brutal styling at the expense of luxury, comfort and grace. Stinger has nothing to do with being the first to arrive at the destination – this car is all about the journey. It’s about passion."

Guillaume believes that to embody that passion, proportion is everything. From the wheelbase to the greenhouse, width and height – and even the shape of individual body panels – getting the perfect balance is critical.

Key to its road presence are its rear-wheel-drive proportions – a long bonnet and short 830mm front overhang, an extended wheelbase (2,905mm) to deliver a spacious cabin, and a long rear overhang (1,095mm) with strong, broad shoulders. Stinger’s stance, proportion and visual balance are designed to lend the car an air of elegance and athleticism, rather than aggression and brutality. Stinger measures 4,830mm in length and 1,870mm in width, and is 1,400 tall. The ‘Coke-bottle’ shape of the car’s flanks highlight the shoulder line, as well as the fastback silhouette.

This may be a new kind of Kia, but the design cues which have stood the company in good stead since Schreyer joined in 2006 are all in evidence. What Guillaume calls the "sleek and sharky" front end has a new interpretation of Kia's 'tiger-nose' grille mounted between complex headlamp units. There is a castellated upper edge to the windscreenand the flanks are simple and unadorned. Visual engagement also comes from the large lower grille and air intake, dark chrome highlights, bold rear diffuser, quad tailpipes and 19-inch wheels.

What exterior decoration does appear is there to aid aerodynamics and ensure the car remains stable at the high speeds it is capable of. At the front there are air curtains and finned gills behind the wheel arches to reduce wake as turbulent air passes around the large wheels and tyres. The final shape of Stinger called for intense collaboration between designers and aerodynamicists to make airflow around the car as clean as possible without diluting the stunning styling. As a result, the bodywork has been tapered slightly towards the rear and there is a partially flat underfloor tray, while the rear spoiler has taken on a slight ducktail shape to reduce lift. Even the roof was lowered slightly to give Stinger more of an aerofoil profile.

Schreyer says: “You cannot believe how excited I am about this car. Stinger is going to fundamentally change the global image of Kia. It will revolutionise the way people think about us. It’s going to propel us upwards into a different era.”

Interior
External gran turismo visual cues are complemented by the layout and atmosphere of the low-slung cabin, with a steeply-raked windscreen and high dashboard running along a horizontal plane. The dashboard’s centre console is split into two specific areas: the infotainment controls sit neatly below a large colour touchscreen, while the climate and ventilation controls are lower down. In front of the driver is a thick, leather-wrapped D-shaped steering wheel and a single instrument binnacle with a combination of analogue and digital instrumentation. The large gauges are ringed in metal and accentuated with sweeping red needles.

The luxurious interior is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into their low-slung Nappa leather seats. The two in front have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To ensure that all drivers can find the perfect position behind the wheel there is also electronic rake and reach adjustment of the steering column – a first for Kia in Europe. Yet another first for the company is a height-adjustable Head-Up display of essential driver information onto the windscreen – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages. 

There is 974mm of headroom in the front and only slightly less – 939mm – in the rear. The respective figures for legroom are 1,083mm and 925mm, and for shoulder room they are 1,433mm and 1,391mm. The boot capacity with the 60:40 split rear seats upright is 406 litres, which extends to 1,114 litres when they are lowered.      

The wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen for the navigation and infotainment system. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which is partially chromed.

The luxurious ambience is emphasised by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

For comfort in all climates, dual automatic air conditioning is fitted, while to aid the driver there is a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and a 360-degree Around-View monitor. 

One of the highlights of the infotainment centre is a concert hall-quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. The system also includes a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with voice recognition and music streaming.        

“Working on this car was a dream. I still get a buzz, a thrill when I think about it, and I have been thinking about it for a very long time. It fills me with pride, and now I just cannot wait to see it on the road,” says Guillaume.

THE TESTING STORY  
27 times around the world to hone the car to perfection

The Nürburgring Nordschleife (North Loop) is known as 'The Green Hell' for very good reason. It runs for more than 13 miles through the Eifel mountains in Germany, and contains 73 corners, a 300-metre difference in height between its highest and lowest points and gradients of up to 17 per cent.

Driving round it demands constant hard acceleration and braking and heavy cornering. There are changing surfaces and cambers offering an unrivalled test of a car's dynamic prowess. As a test facility it is merciless, which is why Kia has established a base there. Every new model – including the Stinger GT S – is tested there to hone its suspension, steering and brakes. The testing regime for the GT S was so punishing that brake pads had to be changed half way through each day.

During the development of the Stinger GT S, prototypes were put through at least 10,000 kilometres, or 480 laps, of high-stress driving around the Nordschleife – not to set a lap time which would be irrelevant to customers, but to ensure the finished product would be a genuine gran turismo. One diesel prototype completed 20,000 km around the Nordschleife. The engine had already covered the full 10,000-kilometre testing distance, but further work to the chassis meant engineers needed to test a series of new components. With new parts fitted, the same powertrain completed a second 10,000-kilometre run.

The automatic transmission was a key focus for powertrain testing. Nordschleife testing identified a need to manage heat in the transmission more efficiently: initially, the temperature of the gearbox oil was rising higher than what was deemed acceptable by the engineers. To counteract this, an oil cooler with a larger surface area was adopted.

Suspension and steering
Stinger’s dynamics presented the engineers with a new challenge. Because this was going to be a totally new kind of car for Kia, the chassis engineers were given a blank canvas for the  suspension and steering characteristics. Their brief was to create a true gran turismo which  would drive the way it looks. The shape of the car inspired efforts to imbue Stinger with agile handling and high levels of body control for enthusiastic drivers, but with a compliant ride that would ensure high-speed cruising comfort over long distances.

The Stinger GT S has MacPherson struts at the front and fully-independent multi-link suspension with wishbones at the rear plus a new adaptive damping system – Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC). DSDC adapts the stroke length of the dampers on the move, and is controlled by acceleration, braking and steering sensors.

Drivers can change the characteristics of the shock absorbers via the Drive Mode Selector, which offers Comfort, Eco, Sport, Sport+ and Smart settings. In Normal mode, low levels of damping force ensure maximum cruising comfort. The suspension continues to firm up slightly under heavy cornering, but the effect is less pronounced than in Sport mode.

The rack-mounted variable-ratio motor-driven power steering system (R-MDPS) provided the chassis engineers with great flexibility for tuning. It allows drivers to choose between two steering modes – Comfort and Sport – via the Drive Mode Selector. These change the level of steering effort required, and also the variable steering ratio.

In Sport mode, the Stinger GT S requires increased on-centre steering effort, and has shorter gearing, reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Comfort mode reduces the steering effort from the on-centre position for more measured steering responses at a cruise and requires more effort as the steering wheel turns, with a linear build-up of resistance to give drivers greater confidence. The result is a steering system providing the same duality as the suspension.

Right-hand-drive versions of the Stinger GT S were put through a further level of dynamic testing in the UK to hone the steering and suspension for the country's uniquely challenging roads.

Brakes
The 365bhp 3.3-litre twin-turbo V6 in the Stinger GT S enables the car to accelerate from 0 to 60mph in just 4.7 seconds, making it the fastest-accelerating production Kia ever. Its high-performance brakes therefore needed to be equal to the task.

To ensure this would be the case, a rigorous range of braking challenges was devised, taking in the Grossglockner High Alpine Road in the Austrian Alps for constant downhill brake testing. Private test facilities in Northern Germany and Eastern Spain, as well as the Nürburgring, were also used.

The brakes not only had to offer strong and consistent braking power. A reassuring and responsive feel to the pedal was also demanded by the engineers, even after repeated heavy braking, for maximum driver confidence. More development work has been carried out on the Stinger’s brakes than on any previous Kia.

They were co-developed with Brembo. The 350mm front and 340mm Brembo ventilated discs are holed and grooved, providing high heat capacity and reduced fade levels under repeated heavy use. They are paired with the most powerful calipers ever found on a Kia.

Kia’s internal tests are designed to validate brakes at temperatures of up to 700°C (1,292°F). Engineers went even further for the Brembo brake system, with temperatures rising to more than 800°C (1,472°F). Even at these temperatures, the brakes continue to offer consistent stopping power and pedal feel.

All roads and all weathers
Kia did not confine Stinger testing to the Nürburgring. Prototypes have been driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator – to test the car’s durability. Extreme climate testing took place across Europe, the Middle East, Asia and North and South America. The Stinger GT S was subjected to extreme cold and heat and high altitudes, and faced the unique demands of the desert, permafrost regions, congested city centres and mountain passes.

The GT S was plunged into Arctic winters to ensure predictable, stable, gran turismo handling in all conditions with the engaging, fun-to-drive character of a rear-wheel drive car. From the development facility in Arjeplog in Swedish Lapland, Kia honed the car in a range of low-grip environments, including a skid-pan, handling circuit and slalom test on the surface of the frozen Uddjaure lake. Kia’s winter test regime saw the Stinger GT S being driven in temperatures as low as -35°C (-31°F).

On-road refinement was equally important, but customers also want to enjoy the sound of the engine at work. The Stinger GT S is the first Kia with an Active Sound system to enhance the engine note via the car’s audio system rather than through an actuator which channels noise into the cabin.

The Active Sound system was engineered in Europe and is consistent with the engine, so that occupants are treated to an authentic V6 note from the 3.3-litre twin-turbo unit. Sound engineers paired the system with the car's Drive Mode Selector so that drivers can change the level of engine noise in the cabin. The sound becomes slightly louder and more aggressive in tone as drivers switch modes.   

Albert Biermann, Kia’s Head of Vehicle Test and High Performance Development, says: “Testing the car in extreme conditions allowed us to focus on its stability and predictability in every configuration and in all driving conditions. Crucially, these tests allowed us to engineer a car which retains the driving appeal that buyers look for in a gran turismo. We want enthusiastic drivers to be able to enjoy the thrill of driving their Stinger in all conditions without compromising on safety.”

THE TECHNICAL STORY 
Powertrain, suspension, steering and brakes befitting a grand tourer

Everything about the Stinger GT S has been engineered to ensure it is an authentic modern gran turismo. From its torquey twin-turbo direct-injection engine to its eight-speed automatic transmission, fully independent suspension with switchable modes, powerful brakes and variable steering, it is a car built for covering long distances swiftly, comfortably and safely while delivering maximum driving pleasure.

The body is composed of 55 per cent high-strength steels to keep weight to a minimum so that the Stinger GT S is as lithe and agile as it looks while ensuring robustness in the event of an accident,  and there is a battery of advanced driver assistance systems to make that accident less likely. And extensive work on sound-deadening ensures it is exceptionally refined, but occupants can still enjoy the sporting tones of the V6 engine thanks to an Active Sound system –­ the first in a Kia.

The 3.3-litre V6 twin-turbo T-GDi engine
Grand tourers should not only be beautiful, comfortable and luxurious – they must also be fast. The twin-turbo engine chosen for the Stinger GT S is ideally suited to the car's role as a long-distance gran turismo.

The 3.3-litre direct-injection twin-turbo V6 T-GDi makes the Stinger GT S the fastest-accelerating Kia ever, with a 0-60mph time of 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 168mph. The engine is a member of the Lambda II range and produces 365bhp at 6,000rpm and a huge 510Nm of torque starting at 1,300rpm and continuing uninterrupted until 4,500rpm.

It features an aluminium block and heads and was developed during a rigorous testing regime focused on responsiveness and efficiency with durability and reliability. There are twin single-scroll turbochargers, an air-cooled intercooler and an integral turbo and exhaust manifold to reduce weight. An electronic wastegate and thermostat help to improve responsiveness. Continuous-variable valve timing (CVVT) enhances intake operation range and operation speed while reducing pumping losses. There are sodium-filled exhaust valves to boost performance and efficiency with maximum durability.

The extensive testing regime to ensure durability and responsiveness also helped efficiency: combined fuel consumption is 28.5mpg, while CO emissions are 225g/km.

To ensure occupants can enjoy the refined and authentic V6 tones of the twin-turbo engine, the Stinger GT S is the first Kia to be fitted with an Active Sound system. This relays the engine note to the cabin through the car's audio system rather than the more conventional actuator. It was engineered in Europe and can be customised through the Drive Mode Selector. 

Eight-speed automatic gearbox
The Stinger GT S drives the rear wheels through an electronic eight-speed automatic gearbox. It was designed in-house and rewards drivers with immediate shifts and optimum fuel efficiency. The transmission marks Kia’s first use of a Centrifugal Pendulum Absorber (CPA) torque converter more typically found in aviation and racing applications. CPA reduces torsional vibrations through the drivetrain.

The transmission offers up to five different shift and throttle programmes, accessed through the car’s electronic Drive Mode Selector. Drivers can leave the car to shift for itself, or change gears with steering wheel-mounted paddles. A Limited Slip Differential is fitted so that torque is transferred to the rear wheel with most grip.

ISG, Kia's engine stop/start system to ensure no fuel is wasted and no emissions are pumped into the air when the car is stationary, is standard. The engine cuts out as soon as the driver brakes to a standstill and restarts when the brake pedal is released.

Running gear
A gran turismo must provide exceptional comfort for occupants on the long distances it is designed to cover, but it must also reward enthusiastic drivers with pliant but controlled suspension, alert steering which does not make the car nervous, and powerful brakes. Thanks to the extensive testing regime on all kinds of roads, in all weathers and across several continents, the Stinger GT S meets those demands. Right-hand-drive cars have undergone additional testing in the UK to meet the unique challenges of the country's roads.      

The suspension is fully independent through MacPherson struts at the front and a five-link set-up featuring double wishbones at the rear, while adaptive Dynamic Stability Damping Control (DSDC) allows the damping force to be changed through the Drive Mode Selector. DSDC permits the driver to choose a more comfort-oriented Normal setting or a Sport setting with more powerful damping force. DSDC varies the stroke length of the shock absorbers according to information on acceleration, braking and steering obtained from sensors.

A variable-ratio version of Kia's rack-mounted Motor Driven Power Steering (R-MDPS) is fitted, and this can also be adjusted via the Drive Mode Selector. The Normal setting requires less turning effort from on-centre, becoming progressively firmer as more lock is added. Sport requires more initial effort, while shorter gearing ensures more immediate response by reducing the need for larger steering inputs. Steering response also benefits from mounting the electric motor on the rack rather than the column. The steering therefore provides the same duality as the suspension.            

The brakes have had more development work than those on any previous Kia to ensure they are up to the performance of the engines. There are 350mm ventilated discs at the front and 340mm ventilated discs at the rear. The brakes were co-developed with Brembo and employ 13.8-inch front and 13.4-inch rear discs, holed and grooved, to provide high heat capacity with low fade, even in repeated heavy use. They were developed on some of the highest mountain passes in Austria, Germany and Spain as well as around the Nürburgring. There are quad-piston front calipers and dual-piston rear calipers.   

The Stinger GT S has 19-inch alloy wheels with 225/40 R19 tyres at the front and even wider 255/35 R19 tyres at the rear.

Safety
The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear.

The safety provisions begin with the sturdy body, 55 per cent of which is composed of high-strength steels so that rigidity and crash protection do not come at the expense of excessive weight. Structural adhesives are used extensively and there is strengthening around the attachment points for the powertrain and chassis, where loads are most concentrated in the vehicle’s frame. By also strengthening the longitudinal and transverse structures and using an engine bay strut bar, the frame exceeds competitive car standards.

In terms of crashworthiness, the Stinger GT S exceeds all competitors. The side member is formed from 80 K-class steel, the rear lower member is formed from 150 K-class steel and as much available crash space as possible has been included. The lightweight high-stiffness body is so strong that it surpasses European car standards.

To achieve this, the lower part of the body, a critical area in a collision, is made of hot stamped, ultra-high-strength steel with a large steel plate. Carefully defined load paths channel impact forces away from the passenger cell, and there are seven airbags – including one for the driver's knees – to protect occupants.   

However, the Stinger GT S has been engineered to ensure that, as much as possible, such features will never be needed thanks to a comprehensive network of advanced driver assistance systems. There is Autonomous Emergency Braking, which automatically intervenes to stop the car if the driver fails to respond to a potential accident, Lane Keep Assist to prevent a driver straying into an adjoining lane accidentally and High Beam Assist to adjust the headlights according to other traffic and local lighting. Driver Attention Warning alerts a tired driver that it is time to take a break, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces. An Active Bonnet which springs upwards upon impact provides additional protection for pedestrians' heads by increasing the distance between the head and the hard points under the engine bay.

There is Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

 

FULL EQUIPPED IN EVERY RESPECT      
Unique flagship for what will eventually be a five-car range 

The Stinger GT S is the flagship version of what will eventually be a five-model range in the UK. Further versions will be added later in 2018.

As the halo model in the Kia line-up, it lacks for nothing in terms of equipment, and features an extensive range of advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity services as standard. Nappa leather upholstery and leather trim, a power-adjustable memory driver's seat, heated seats and steering wheel, a smart key entry system with an engine start/stop button and an 8.0-inch touchscreen navigation and infotainment system are just a few of the specification highlights, while among the firsts for Kia in Europe are an adjustable full-colour head-up display and electronic rake and reach steering adjustment. 

Advanced connectivity and driver assistance systems
Kia develops its advanced driver assistance systems under the Drive Wise banner. In the Stinger GT S, it encompasses Autonomous Emergency Braking, Lane Keep Assist and High Beam Assist, and there is a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, these act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver. An Active Bonnet provides additional protection for pedestrians' heads in a collision.

There is Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system.

The touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. The Stinger GT S also has Kia Connected Services with TomTom, giving access to traffic, speed camera and weather information plus local search details in a number of categories. This is supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay connectivity which, via pre-downloaded apps on a suitable smartphone, links the car to maps, music, podcasts and texts through voice commands.

There are front and rear USB ports and a wireless phone charger.

Luxury in every respect
The luxurious interior of the Stinger GT S is a blend of cocooning intimacy and space for five people and their luggage. Occupants slip down into low-slung Nappa leather seats. There is a horizontal sweep to the high-mounted, wing-shaped dashboard – also covered in leather – which is broken only by the 8.0-inch touchscreen. Leather also adorns the door armrests, the D-shaped steering wheel and the gearshifter, which also is partially chromed.

The front seats have eight-way power adjustment – with a memory function on the driver's side – and a two-way power cushion extender plus four-way power lumbar adjustment. The front seats and steering wheel are heated and ventilated, while the outer rear seats are also heated. To ensure that all drivers can find the perfect position behind the wheel, there is also electronic rake and reach adjustment of the steering column.

The Stinger GT S has dual automatic air conditioning, a 7.0-inch LCD Thin Film Transistor (TFT) supervision cluster and the customisable head-up display projecting key information – speed, navigation instructions and audio, cruise control and blind spot detection messages –onto the windscreen, while a 360-degree around-view monitor is especially helpful when parking. 

One of the highlights of the infotainment centre is a concert hall-quality 15-speaker harman/kardon premium sound system with subwoofer, external amp and front centre speaker. It includes Clari-Fi, which restores the sound often lost when digital music files are heavily compressed, and QuantumLogic Surround Sound, which redistributes signals from the original recording to deliver multi-dimensional playback. There is also a DAB radio, MP3 compatibility and Bluetooth with voice recognition and music streaming.    

Nineteen-inch alloy wheels are fitted and house 350mm front and 340mm rear ventilated brake discs co-developed with Brembo.

The Stinger GT S also has an electric one-touch sunroof and LED headlamps, daytime running lights and tail lamps. There are quad exhaust pipes.

To emphasise the quality designed and engineered into the Stinger GT S, the luxurious ambience is enhanced by an aluminium-finish centre console, a chrome strip running all the way around the cabin, suede headlining, satin chrome interior door handles, alloy pedals, stainless steel door scuff plates and five aeronautically inspired spoked circular air vents.

 

THE TECHNOLOGY STORY    
The best in advanced driver assistance systems and connectivity

The Stinger GT S may evoke memories of the golden age of gran turismos, but it is not a retro car. Its advanced driver aids take into account that roads are busier and there are more distractions than yesteryear, while its 8.0-inch touchscreen infotainment system acknowledges that drivers no longer use maps to find their way around but expect the car to guide them to their destination, and that they expect to remain fully connected throughout the journey. The navigation instructions – along with other essential information such as the car's speed plus audio, cruise control and blind spot detection information – are displayed on the windscreen through a height-adjustable full-colour head-up display, which is a first for Kia.

The advanced driver aids are controlled by cameras and radar to supplement the driver's vision and reactions. They are not there to take over the operation of the car or to spoil the driver's enjoyment in driving it.

Kia develops its advanced driver assistance systems under the Drive Wise banner. In the Stinger GT S, it encompasses Autonomous Emergency Braking, which employs both short- and long-range radar systems so that it can detect vehicles and pedestrians at greater distances and higher speeds. The short-range radar operates at typical city speeds of up to 31mph. Between 19mph and 50mph the longer-range radar also comes into play to detect obstacles in the car's path and respond by automatically slowing the car, to a complete stop if necessary. The pedestrian detection function operates at up to 37mph.

Lane Keep Assist prevents the driver from straying into an adjoining lane accidentally. If the driver begins to change lane without first indicating, Stinger will issue audible and visual alerts and, if no action is taken, steer itself back into lane. Lane Keep Assist is therefore more effective than a simple lane departure warning.

One reason why drivers might inadvertently change lanes is that they are becoming tired. Stinger mitigates against that through its Driver Attention Warning. Through a camera and sensors it first builds up a profile of the driving style of the person behind the wheel. If it then detects significant variations from that profile it alerts the driver that it is time to take a break.

High Beam Assist automatically adjusts the headlight beam range between main and dipped according to other traffic and local lighting. The Stinger GT S also has a Speed Limit Information system.  

These are supplemented with Blind Spot Detection with Rear Cross Traffic Alert: together, they act as an extra pair of eyes for the driver, warning of vehicles approaching out of eye-line when changing lanes or exiting parallel parking spaces.

An Active Bonnet provides additional protection for pedestrians in a collision, springing upwards to give greater space between the head of the person in the collision and the hard points in the engine bay.

The Stinger GT S has Electronic Stability Control linked to Vehicle Stability Management (VSM) to correct potential skids without any intervention from the driver. VSM incorporates a new dynamic torque vectoring system which monitors driver inputs and road conditions and automatically applies power and braking force to the inner rear wheel to minimise understeer and enhance tractability and steering feel.

The standard touchscreen navigation has full European mapping and a Traffic Messaging Channel. A reversing camera is included.

To ensure occupants remain fully connected on any journey the Stinger GT S is linked to Kia Connected Services with TomTom, supplemented by Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

Kia Connected Services with TomTom are accessed through the 8.0-inch touchscreen. The information available to drivers includes live traffic updates, weather reports, speed camera locations and local point-of-interest searches, from the location of Kia dealerships to nearby restaurants and hotels.

Android Auto and Apple CarPlay are available when the system is paired with Android smartphones running 5.0 (Lollipop) or higher or an iPhone 5 and newer versions of the Apple handset. Both allow occupants to connect to various apps and functions, including voice-guided, hands-free calls and texts and voice recognition. Android Auto gives access to Google maps navigation and Google Play music, while Apple CarPlay links to pre-loaded maps, music, podcasts, texts and messages and audiobooks, all through Siri voice control. The Stinger GT S also has Bluetooth with music streaming and voice control and a wireless mobile device charger.

 

THE OWNERSHIP STORY 
The reliability, warranty and affordable running costs expected of a Kia

The Stinger GT S may be a completely new kind of Kia – but it is still a Kia. That means it has the reliability to sustain Kia's industry-leading seven-year or 100,000-mile warranty, which – as with every one of the company's models – is supplied as standard.

Every prototype was driven for at least 10,000 kilometres around the Nürburgring Nordschleife, not only to hone the car's dynamic abilities, but also to ensure Stinger would be just as durable as any other Kia. Prototypes were also driven for more than 1.1 million kilometres – the equivalent of 27 times around the Equator ­– on all kinds of roads and in the most extreme climates to test the car's durability. Right-hand-drive versions were further tested in the UK to ensure they could meet the unique challenges posed by the country's roads.   

The Stinger GT S is extensively equipped and does not require buyers to spend a small fortune on options to bring the car up to an aceptable specification. And while a car such as the Stinger GT S can never be cheap to run, ownership costs are far from outlandish.

Fuel consumption (mpg) and CO2 (g/km)

Model

Comb. mpg

CO2 g/km

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

28.5

225

 

Benefit-in-kind taxation rates and VED (2017-18)

Model

Tax rate

VED first year/thereafter

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

37%

£1,200/£450*


* For five years: £140 per year thereafter

Insurance group

Model

1-50

Stinger 3.3 V6 GT S

41


Servicing
6,000 miles or every six months, whichever comes sooner

Care-3 and Care-3 Plus – Kia’s service packages for retail customers – are available and offer fixed-cost and inflation-proof servicing for the first three or five years. All work is carried out by trained technicians using genuine Kia replacement parts and specified oils. Both packages cover the car, not the owner, so are transferable should the vehicle be sold.  If a vehicle with a Care-3 package is sold on then the next owner may upgrade to the five-year service package. 

Warranty and support
Kia set a new benchmark in 2007 when it launched the cee'd with an industry-best seven-year warranty.  That demonstration of faith in the quality and reliability of Kia products has subsequently been extended to every model.

A major benefit is that it is transferable to subsequent owners at no charge as long as the seven-year time limit has not been reached and the mileage is below 100,000.  If the car is sold when less than 18 months old or with less than 18,000 miles on the clock, the warranty is topped up to match that of a new model.

The mechanical warranty is supported by a 12-year anti-perforation warranty and a five-year paint warranty plus one-year Europe-wide roadside assistance through KIAssist.

 

MANUFACTURING AND THE ENVIRONMENT    
Built in South Korea on a special rear-wheel-drive production line

The Stinger GT S is built at Kia's Sohari factory in South Korea, on a special production line dedicated to rear-wheel-drive cars. The same line also builds the Kia K9 (K900 in America and Quoris in some Middle East and South America markets), and is a relatively new addition to the Sohari plant, emphasising the versatility of Kia production facilities and the company's willingness to adapt to suit its changing market ambitions and global image.

Sohari is the place where it all started for Kia as we know it today: the plant opened in June 1973. It is located within greater Seoul, on a 500,000m2 site to the south-west of the city centre, and currently has a staff of just under 5,300. Sohari is capable of building 350,000 cars a year. Stinger production is not limited, so output can be adapted to accommodate demand.

Sohari may be Kia’s oldest plant, but it has been extensively modernised to improve its efficiency and the lives of the people working there, reduce its impact on the environment and to ensure that the quality of cars leaving the factory gates is at an all-time high.

Although only about 2 per cent of a car’s lifetime CO2 emissions are created during manufacture, this can still amount to a substantial figure when multiplied by the total production capacity of a factory. So, even small improvements can add up to major reductions when rolled out across the entire production network. All Kia plants are working to reduce their impact on the environment by putting in place clean and efficient processes.

In recent years the focus at Sohari has been on developing ever more flexible production systems. As part of that, staff have been encouraged to find and adopt  innovative production activities.  Everyone at Sohari has been helping to make the plant less wasteful and more environmentally friendly. As a result, the plant has been one of Kia’s leading lights in environmental change.

Improved painting facilities have been installed, and every aspect of vehicle production has been under scrutiny to ensure the plant uses less energy and produces less waste. Water and power consumption, dust and CO2 emissions per vehicle produced and contaminants and waste volumes have all been reduced.

Kia has made reducing the amount of raw materials being fed into the production process a major priority in every production facility around the globe. Over the last few years there has been significant progress in reducing waste, increasing recycling and developing cleaner production processes.

Exhaust pollutants from Sohari have also decreased dramatically – dust, NOx and SO2 output have all been reduced.

New technology is playing a significant part in environmental improvement. Typical cast melting furnaces produce large amounts of dust and contained within this is a high proportion of zinc. The captured dust is treated and the zinc extracted before being re-used within the production process.

More technology is employed in the machining shops where gearboxes are produced. Compressed air is used as a coolant when machining intricate gearbox internals, rather than cutting oil. This and the associated oil mist are problem pollutants and the new scheme is helping reduce oil use.

The green landscape around each facility is an important part of each plant make-up. One ongoing programme is based on a number of ‘ecology gardens’ which are filled with trees and plants resistant and sensitive to environmental changes in air pollution. Sohari is no different, with more than 25,800m2 of green areas and 24,500 trees planted in and around the facility. This has the added benefits of providing a more comfortable environment for the staff and local population and offsetting some of the CO2 output from the plant.

These ‘ecology gardens’ are continually monitored as they act as a real-world indicators to air quality. Each site is broadening its green patches and constantly monitoring air pollution in neighbouring communities. A monthly task for each facility is the ‘One Stream Clean-up’ programme where Kia staff clean and maintain local, natural streams. This is not only to monitor their cleanliness but also to keep them well maintained for the local communities to enjoy.

The overall effect of the many green initiatives – reducing the use of raw materials, recycling more and reducing waste – has resulted in Sohari being officially recognised as an eco-friendly worksite by the Korean Ministry of the Environment.

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
Things we think you'll want to know

  1. Why has it taken six years to turn the GT Concept into a production car?
  2. There are three reasons. The first is that we wanted to enhance our brand's positioning so that a model like the Stinger GT S would be sustainable within our line- up. The Kia of 2018 is very different to the Kia of 2011, when the GT Concept was revealed. Kia is now a design-led challenger brand, not one known purely for mass- market transport rooted in value. Then we had to find somewhere to build it. That became possible when we introduced the K9/K900 luxury saloon (not sold in the UK),   which is also rear-wheel drive. The Stinger GT S goes down the same production line.  And finally we were determined to undertake arguably the most rigorous testing regime for any car in our history to ensure that Stinger would be an authentic gran   turismo.         

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you thought it would never make it into production?
  2. Our President of Design and Chief Design Officer Peter Schreyer and European Head of Design Gregory Guillaume jokingly say that they had a bet – for a case of champagne – over whether a car based on the GT Concept would ever be produced, but the truth is that there was always great enthusiasm from all within Kia for a car like the Stinger GT S. Peter Schreyer says the faces of senior management would light up whenever the subject of a gran turismo was raised at planning meetings. The important thing was to get the timing right, from both a marketing and a practical standpoint.   

 

  1. The 2011 concept car was called GT, and you had a second concept car named Stinger. Why switch the names?
  2. Everyone within Kia felt that 'GT' was too bland a name for a car as stunning as the Stinger GT S, and it is also a name used by several other manufacturers. We think 'Stinger' perfectly describes the style, character and intent of our new gran turismo.   

 

  1. Was there ever a time when you considered making it front-wheel drive?
  2. No. From the outset it was decreed that if we were going to produce a classic-style gran turismo, it had to be rear-wheel drive.

 

  1. Was a V8 engine ever under consideration for the GT S?
  2. No. We could fit one under the bonnet, but Kia's policy is to downsize engines to improve fuel economy and emissions, and to use turbocharging and direct injection to ensure they deliver the performance we seek. We think a 4.7-second 0-60mph time is a pretty impressive acceleration figure.

 

Now that you have stuck a toe in the water with Stinger, will there be more cars outside your mainstream line-up of saloons, hatchbacks, SUVs and estates?
Two factors always govern our planning decisions: is there a business case, and can we produce different kinds of car without disrupting the output of our existing models? If the answer to both questions is 'yes' then we will go ahead. Kia management, designers and engineers are just as much car people as those with any other company, and they are eager to stretch their imaginations and talents.   

Ends 

For further information on Kia please visit www.kiapressoffice.com or contact:

Stephen Kitson
Director of Corporate Communications

E: skitson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 075 M: 07795 011 936

Daniel Sayles
Press Relations Manager

E: dsayles@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 073 M: 07747 149 149

Sara Robinson
Senior Press Officer

E: srobinson@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 072 M: 07919 482 332

Moyosola Fujamade
Press Officer (Events)

E: mfujamade@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 069 M: 07471 216 343

Lauren Martin
Press Officer (Press Fleet)

E: lmartin@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 071 M: 07557 268 252

Chloe Farmer
Press Office Assistant

E: cfarmer@kia.co.uk
T: 01932 832 079 M: 07795 011 475

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TECHNICAL INFORMATION

All-New Kia Stinger and Stinger GT S

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS - STINGER
All the facts and figures                                                                   

2.2-litre CRDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 2,199

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 85.4 x 96

 Power output

 bhp

 197 @ 3,800rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 440 (325) @ 1,750-2,750rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 16.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line DOHC common rail direct-injection

turbocharged

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.385

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs, 320mm (front) and solid discs, 315mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max.

 kg

 1,778 / 1,881

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max.

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 7.3

 Maximum speed

 mph

 143

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 42.8 / 57.6 / 50.4

 CO2

 g/km

154

 

 2.0 T-GDi

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 4 / 16

 Displacement

 cc

 1,998

 Bore x stroke

 mm

 86 x 86

 Power output

 bhp

 244 @ 6,200 rpm

 Torque output

 Nm (lb/ft)

 353 (260) @ 1,400-3500rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0:1

 Engine details

 

In-line direct-injection turbocharged with CVVT

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.964

 2.468

 1.610

 1.176

 1.000

 0.832

 0.652

 0.565

 2.273

 3.727

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar

 Braking system

 Ventilated discs all round, 345mm (front) and 330mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy  8J x 18 inch

 Tyres

 225/45 R18

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2,905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,717 / 1,833

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 5.8

 Maximum speed

 mph

 149

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg

 23.6 / 44.1 / 35.8

 

 CO2

 g/km

 181

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS - STINGER GT S
All the facts and figures  

3.3 T-GDi V6

 No. of cylinders/valves

 

 6 / 24

 Displacement

 cc

 3,342

 Bore / stroke

 mm

 92 x 83.8

 Power output

 bhp

 365 @ 6,000rpm

 Torque output

 Nm

 510 (376) @ 1,300–4,500 rpm

 Compression ratio

 

 10.0: 1

 Engine details

 

 Twin-turbocharged V6 with direct injection

 

Transmission

 Transmission

 

 Eight-speed automatic

 Gear ratios

 1st gear

 2nd gear

 3rd gear

 4th gear

 5th gear

 6th gear

 7th gear

 8th gear

 Reverse

 Final drive

 3.665

 2.396

 1.610

 1.190

 1.000

 0.826

 0.643

 0.556

 2.273

 3.538

 

Suspension, steering and braking

 Front axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted MacPherson struts with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Rear axle

 Fully independent subframe-mounted double wishbones with coil springs, gas-filled dampers and anti-roll stabiliser bar. Electronic Dynamic Stability Damping Control

 Braking system

 Brembo ventilated discs all round, 350mm (front) and 340mm (rear)

 Steering

 Rack-mounted variable ratio motor driven power steering, rack and pinion, 2.4 turns lock-lock

 Wheels

 Alloy 8J x 19 front;    8.5J x 19 rear

 Tyres

 225/40 R19 front; 255/35 R19 rear

 Spare wheel

 Instant mobility (tyre inflation) system

 

Dimensions and weights

 Wheelbase

 mm

 2.905

 Overall – l / w / h

 mm

 4,830 / 1,870 / 1,400

 Kerb weight min./max

 kg

1,855 / 1,907

 

 Tow weights - braked/unbraked

 kg

 1,500 / 750

 

 Boot capacity (VDA) min./max

 litres

 406 / 1,114

 Roof load capacity

 kg

 90

 Turning circle

 m

 11.2

 Tank capacity

 litres

 60

 Drag coefficient

 Cd

 0.30

 

Performance and fuel consumption

 Acceleration 0-60 mph

 seconds

 4.7

 Maximum speed

 mph

 168

 Fuel consumption – urb/x.urb/com

 mpg    

 

 20.8 / 36.2 / 28.5

 CO2

 g/km   

 

 225

 

 



ALL-NEW STINGER NEWS

THREE TROPHIES FOR KIA AT THE 2018 iF DESIGN AWARDS

Kia Motors has won three prestigious 2018 iF Design Awards, reinforcing the brand’s reputation for striking car design. The all-new Kia Stinger gran turismo, Stonic compact crossover and Picanto city car were each awarded prizes in the ‘Product Design’ category.

Feb 9, 2018
:
4
:
0

KIA PICANTO AND STINGER WIN AT WHAT CAR? AWARDS 2018

Following on from a successful 2017 which saw over 93,200 models sold, and four new model launches, Kia has received yet more good news to celebrate – winning two awards at the 40th anniversary What Car? Awards, held in London.

Jan 23, 2018
:
7
:
0

STINGER STORMS DOWN CORNWALL AIRPORT NEWQUAY RUNWAY

In a display of astonishing high speed to celebrate the official UK media launch of the new Kia Stinger, three ‘GT S’ models took to Cornwall Airport Newquay’s runway achieving speeds of over 150mph.

Nov 14, 2017
:
10
:
2

STUNNING KIA STINGER GRAN TURISMO ARRIVES IN THE UK

It's here at last! The stunning Kia Stinger, an elegant gran turismo based on the 2011 Kia GT Concept from the Frankfurt Motor Show, is now in full production and today goes on sale in the UK priced from £31,995.

Nov 13, 2017
:
204
:
2

FASTBACK KIA STINGER REVEALED IN EUROPEAN SPECIFICATION

Kia Motors has revealed the European specification of the Kia Stinger, a powerful new fastback sports sedan, following its global premiere at the 2017 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) in Detroit on 9 January.

Jan 18, 2017
:
1
:
0

THE CURVE AHEAD REACHES THE END OF THE ROAD

Intrigued and excited Kia-watchers don’t have to wait much longer to see just what www.thecurveahead.net has been trailing for the last month. The wait is almost over!

Jan 6, 2017
:
0
:
0

ATTENTION TO DETAIL

The curve ahead represents unchartered territory, or a journey into the unknown. As an exciting new paradigm of performance beckons, it’s Kia’s attention to daring design detail that makes the journey more alluring.

Jan 3, 2017
:
3
:
0

THE SILHOUETTE

Curiosity is the desire, the need to learn more. On the road, it is the fascination about what lies beyond the curve ahead.

Dec 21, 2016
:
1
:
0

THE FASTEST-ACCELERATING KIA

0-to-100 kph. A benchmark for any car operating on a higher level of performance, and the number that enthusiasts look for first.

Dec 12, 2016
:
3
:
1

TWISTS AND TURNS

The curve ahead is all about potential. The potential to clip every apex, and consume every straight.

Dec 1, 2016
:
4
:
1